Egyptian Hoard of the Second Century, A.D

Author
Weber, Shirley Howard, 1883-1962
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Numismatic Notes and Monographs
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American Numismatic Society
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New York
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Open access edition funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Humanities Open Book Program.

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AN EGYPTIAN HOARD OF THE SECOND CENTURY, A. D.

By Shirley H. Weber

The small hoard of silver coins under consideration in this article was purchased in to to by Mr. Newell in Cairo in December 1923, and has been very kindly entrusted by him to the writer for study. The dealer in antiquities from whom the coins were purchased assured Mr. Newell that they formed a single hoard which had very recently been found by certain fellahin at Sakha in the Delta, and that to the best of his knowledge the hoard was intact. His statements are borne out by an examination of the coins. It is certain that they all came from one hoard: they were all covered with a distinctive patina composed of several layers of purple oxide and verdegris, so thick that each coin was a formless lump on which the outlines of the design were scarcely distinguishable. That we have the complete hoard before us cannot be asserted so confidently. The finders might very easily, have kept back some part of the find. But during a sojourn of some weeks following the purchase, after spending considerable time in looking over the stocks of the many dealers in Cairo and in Alexandria, Mr. Newell was unable to find any trace of other coins like those in the hoard. Certainly no casual tourist would have wished to purchase mere formless lumps of metal so encrusted that only a person accustomed to handling such objects could be certain even that they were silver. That the hoard was found in the Delta is very likely, but this cannot be proved.

A feature of the hoard before us is the curious and unusual association in it of coins of the Peloponnesus and of Rhodes of the second and first centuries before Christ, with Roman denarii of the first and second centuries after Christ. There can be no question that we are dealing with one hoard, and not with two hoards mixed together. There are two instances where a Greek and a Roman coin are glued together by their common corrosion; these have not been cleaned, except so far as to enable one to distinguish their types. In one instance we have a Rhodian hemidracham (type of B. M. C. Caria, PI. XL, 12) still adhering to a quinarius of Trajan from the mint of Caesarea (B. M. C. Gal. etc. p. 53, No. 54, PI. IX, 11), and again, a triobol of the Achaean League with a denarius of Domitian. These coins have not been separated, as it was deemed more important to keep them together for demonstration, than to separate them merely to determine their exact variety, as was done with other adhering coins in the hoard.

The Greek coins are for the most part varieties of the coins of the Achaean League, chiefly from Elis, and of Sicyon, Argos and Rhodes, in much worn condition. The Roman coins date from the last years of Nero to the end of Trajan's reign, and every reign is represented, Trajan's having the largest number. The earlier denarii down to the end of the reign of Titus and some of those of Domitian, as might be expected, are more or less worn; many of Domitian's are in splendid condition, while those of Nerva and Trajan are almost without exception in brilliant condition, showing little, if any evidence of circulation. The latest coins in the hoard are from Trajan's sixth consulship (114–117 A. D.) and we can place the burial of the hoard at about that time—shortly before, or immediately after the emperor's death.

The details recounted above are mostly taken from Mr. Newell's notes, which he turned over to the writer with the hoard. There are two important questions to be considered in connection with this find, which make it unique in the annals of coin finds in Egypt, (1) How explain the presence of a quantity of Roman denarii in Egypt? (2) How account for the presence with them of a number of Greek coins of at least two centuries earlier?

(1). After the acquisition of Egypt by the Romans, it became an imperial province, and, in accordance with a policy initiated by Augustus, was treated by successive emperors as a province apart from the other imperial provinces.1 The final Ptolemaic coinage was allowed by Augustus to continue in use, and the Roman denarius equated to a tetradrachm, which from the reign of Ptolemy XIII Auletes was no longer of even approximately pure silver. With the reign of Tiberius, a new tetradrachm of billon was introduced, the value of which was set at that of a denarius.2 This billon coinage, minted at Alexandria, with its fractions in copper, continued in circulation and furnished the bulk of the money for the daily needs of the province until the reign of Diocletian. Now it has been noted3 that while the denarius apparently circulated freely about the shores of the Mediterranean in the early centuries of our era, its occurrence in Egypt is comparatively rare; the rubbish mounds, while yielding immense quantities of the local billon money, seldom give forth denarii singly or in hoards. Sig. Dattari, who for years examined most of the hoards found in Egypt,4 noted only one hoard of denarii ranging from the reign of Vespasian to Marcus Aurelius, and two or three from the time of the Severi. These small lots Milne thinks were either military in origin, or the property of some Roman official. The accounts on papyri or ostraca, where military accounts are often stated in Roman currency, would bear out this opinion, as would also the scarcity of documents that mention denarii and do not deal with the affairs of the Roman government. This apparent scarcity of the denarius in the daily business life of Egypt as reflected in the papyri was noted by Mommsen,5 who advanced the theory that the rather frequent occurrence of the words άργυρίου δραχμαί in settlements of accounts must refer interchangeably to the Ptolemaic silver or to the denarius. Sig. Segr� 6 has found an explanation of the scarcity of denarii in Egyptian hoards that is probably correct. He suggests that the denarius, standardized with the Alexandrine tetradrachm, was considered as legal tender in Egypt, because the standard Roman coin of gold and silver was current in all the provinces of the Empire. But in effect the denarius did not circulate in Egypt, due to the exceptional monetary advantage accorded the Romans in Egypt, so that the intrinsic value of the Roman silver maintained itself above that of the Alexandrine tetradrachm. In the second and third centuries the ratio between the silver of the denarius and the imperial Alexandrine tetradrachm became increasingly more unfavorable to the Alexandrine money, which then had to be limited in circulation to internal use, while the Roman denarius of high intrinsic value, was almost eliminated from local circulation. This, he concludes, is the reason for the rarity of finds of hoards in Egypt before the time of the Severi.

(2). Let us turn for a moment to the other question, that concerning the presence of a number of Greek coins in the hoard. Of these, there are twelve from Rhodes of circa 166–88 B. C., three from Argos of circa 322–229 B. C., five of Sicyon of circa 250–146 B. C., and of those of the Achaean League after 280 B. C. three are from Aegium, nine from Elis, one from Pallantium, and one of doubtful provenance. All of these were coins that became standard for a time beyond the districts in which they were issued. The coins of Rhodes enjoyed a wide circulation about the shores of the Eastern Mediterranean long after they ceased to be struck.7 The abundance of coins of the Achaean League in finds testifies to an almost equal popularity. Argos and Sicyon, two very prosperous communities during the Hellenistic period, continued to strike coins of their own even while members of the Achaean League, and these enjoyed a wide circulation in the Peloponnesus. The established use of these coins continued long after the introduction of the denarius, so that we find references in writers like Polybius, Plutarch and Dio to the various Greek drachmae and the Roman denarius alike by the word δραχμή. To quote Head (l. c.) "It is quite probable that a loose use of the word δραχμή for all silver coins of about the size of the Roman denarius, great numbers of which must have remained in circulation for a century or perhaps two, after they were issued, was very general at this time." The remarkable fact, then, that is pointed out by this hoard, is the persistence of these coins in circulation, for perhaps as long as two centuries beyond Head's estimate. The owner would not have treasured them along with the denarii if they had no commercial value, unless he were a collector of coins, a numismatist, and we have no certain evidence for the existence of such in antiquity, nor would any numismatist; ancient or modern, make a collection of coins of this combination. The extreme wear on the Greek coins indicates long use before they entered the hoard, which was probably begun some time in Domitian's reign, as may be judged from the wear on the coins of his imperial predecessors, and the very slight wear on the coins of that emperor and his successors.

To return to the other question, namely the presence of this combination of Greek and Roman coins in Egypt. It might be suggested that they were the property of a Roman soldier in Egypt. But soldiers are more likely to be spenders than savers, and seldom left hoards, so far as we know. Even if this objection can be overridden, it is impossible that a Roman soldier should have been transferred from Achaea to the peculiarly imperial province of Egypt, because Achaea was a senatorial province which had no soldiers. Then the total absence from this hoard of Ptolemaic silver, which remained in circulation in Egypt, as we know from the papyri, until the end of the third century of our era,8 is a striking characteristic. If the hoard is representative of the better coinage in ciruclation in Egypt in Trajan's time, certainly by Gresham's law some Ptolemaic silver should have been included in it. But this negative evidence drives us to the conclusion that the hoard was not intended for use in Egypt; it was the property of some resident of Achaea, temporarily sojourning in Egypt, probably in or near Alexandria (the dealer had a suspicion, but no actual proof, that the hoard came from the Delta), who intended to return to Greece where his money would be good. This intention was in some way prevented, and the coins remained in Egypt, to be discovered in our time.

Just as this paper goes to press, an article by F. Heichelheim 9 has appeared in Klio which throws further light upon the reason for the burial of the hoard. In this article, the writer comments on the sudden fall of the value of the Roman aureus especially in Egypt under Trajan. A sudden fall in the value of gold would make some careful merchant or banker who had dealings with the countries about the Mediterranean, save the pieces of good silver that fell into his hands. A merchant in the Delta, where the hoard is supposed to have been found, would be able to pick up these coins from abroad and save them with the silver denarii of Rome. Trade with the outside world must have been very active. These silver coins would be safer to save than the aurei, the value of which was uncertain. With this explanation, the association of the Greek with the Roman coins does not seem so strange.

After the time of Trajan, the aureus seems to have maintained its value, hence we find few hoards of denarii in later years. The finding of this hoard, then, confirms the points made by Heichelheim.

The five coins of Trajan with Greek inscriptions from the mint of Caesarea in Cappadocia belong naturally in the hoard, when we understand the presence of the coins of Greece and Rhodes. The mints of the great eastern cities of Antioch and Caesarea turned out great quantities of silver that circulated abundantly in the Eastern Mediterranean, and furnished a staple coinage for the East.

The hoard then has furnished us with these facts: first, that the coins of certain Greek cities remained in circulation under the Roman Empire for a longer period than was formerly supposed; second, that these coins passed current, in ordinary transactions, on a footing at least equal to the denarius. This state of affairs in the eastern part of the empire would accord with the well known Roman policy of disturbing as little as possible existing institutions in the acquired provinces.

There are on the coins of the Achaean League in the hoard some combinations of monograms not hitherto noted, and on the other Greek coins, some new magistrates' names. These have been noted in the list in the proper places. For the identification of the Roman coins, I have used Mattingly and Sydenham's Roman Imperial Coinage (London, 1923–6) rather than Cohen's Descr. Hist, des Monnaies Imp�riales Romaines which has a less scientific arrangement. For the coins of the reign of Trajan, I have inserted also references to Strack's 10 recent work on the coins of that Emperor. There are some rare and unusual combinations of types, as I have noted in the commentary.

Here follows for the imperial coins a table of frequencies of occurrence for the various emperors:

Emperor Date A. D. No. of yrs. in reign No. of Coins in Hoard Average coins per year of reign
Nero 54–68 14 2
Galba 68–69 7 mos. 1
Otho 69 3 mos. 2
Vitellius 69 11 mos. 2
Vespasian 69–79 10 yrs. 29 3–
Titus 79–81 2 7 3 1/2
Domitian 81–96 15 60 4
Nerva 96–98 ca. 1 yr. 4 mos. 24 18
Trajan 98–117 19 138 7 +

Note: The coins of Titus and Domitian struck under the reign of their predecessor, are listed with his coins. Coins of female relatives of the emperor are counted with his coins. The coins from Caesarea have been counted with the other coins of Trajan.

In the above table disregarding the figures of the first four because of their smallness, it is interesting to note an increased average of coins per year in the hoard as we approach the time of burial. This is as should be expected. The exceptional increase in Nerva's reign out of all proportion to his regnal years is probably due to the energy of the hoarder during that period. The figures of the table in general bear out the remarks already made above on the evidences of wear on the coins.

I should like here to express my very great appreciation to Mr. Newell, Mr. S. P. Noe and Mrs. Agnes B. Brett for their many kind and helpful suggestions.

Rhodes 166–88 B. C.

1. Head of Helios r., radiate.

℞ Shallow incuse square containing P O; rose with bud on r. and symbol on l.; magistrate's name above. Cf. B. M. C. Caria, p. 252 f. Symbol and name illegible. Chipped. image drachm 1.38.

2. Similar. Symbol, caduceus (?). KAΛΛ [IΞENHΣ] (?) Cf. B. M. C. p. 254, No. 267. image drachm 1.59.

3. Similar. Symbol, hand holding ear of corn. NIK[H]ΦOPOΣ. Cf. B. M. C. p. 255, No. 276; PI. XL, 8. image drachm 2.13.

4. Similar. Symbol and inscr. illegible. image drachm 1.73.

5.* Fragment of coin of Rhodes, ℞ outward, similar to above, TA; adhering to ℞ of coin of Caesarea (Cappadocia), B. M. C. Gal., Capp. etc., p. 53, No. 54, AϒTKAIΣ|NEP|TPAIAN|ΣEB|ΓEPM, head of Emperor r. laur. Pl. II.

6.* ℞ of drachm of Rhodes adhering to ℞ of coin of Argos. Rhodes: radiate head, r. Argos: forepart of wolf, r. image. Combined weight, 3.54.

ca. 88–43 B. C.

Type: Head of Helios, three-quarters r.

℞ Full-blown rose to front; magistrate's name with symbol. Cf. B. M. C. Caria, p. 260 f.

7.* ANTIΛE[ΩN] symbol, aplustre. Apparently a new name, image 2.05. (Edges badly broken.)

8. Similar. [T]IMOΞENOΣ symbol, oenochoe and tripod. B. M. C. No. 341. image 3.23 (broken.)

9. Similar. APXIΔ[. . . .] A new name. image 3.38 (edge chipped).

10. Similar. Broken and mended. image 1.12. Inscriptions illegible.

11. Similar. Inscription illegible, image fragmentary.

12. Similar. ℞ stuck to fragment of another coin. Illegible.

Argos 322–229 B. C.

Forepart of wolf r.

A with symbol and magistrate's name.

13. [. . . .]KΛEOΣ. Cf. B. M. C. Pelop. p. 144, No. 110; Hunt. Cat. II p. 153, No. 13. image I.78.

14. Two coins adhering; v. No. 6.

Sicyon—Triobols—250–146 B. C.

15.* Dove flying r.

℞ Σ in shallow incuse square and magistrate's name, OΛϒ[M]|ПIA|ΔAΣ. Part of name covered by fragment of adhering coin of Rhodes, B. M. C. Caria, p. 254. B. M. C. Pelop. p. 52, No. 197. image 2.59.

16. Similar.

℞ [K]ΛE|AN|ΔPO. B. M. C. Pelop. p. 52, No. 195. image 2.13.

17. Similar.

℞ KΛE|AN|ΔP. image 1.85.

18. Dove flying 1.

℞ ПP[O]|[MA]XI|ΔAΣ., B. M. C. Pelop. p. 52, No. 200. image 1.80.

19. Similar.

℞ Traces of name, probably the same as on No. 15. image 1.62.


DRACHMS OF ACHAEAN LEAGUE AFTER 280 B. C.

Aegium

20. Head of Zeus r., laureate [AIГIEΩN].

℞ API |ΣTOΔA | MOC (Coin mutilated and patched.) B. M. C. Pelop. No. 24. Clerk, p. 3. image 1.90.

21. Similar.

℞ Similar. Symbol, thunderbolt. Badly chipped. image 1.52.

22. Similar.

℞ Inscription obliterated. Much worn, image 1.73.

Elis

23.* Head of Zeus r., laureate.

Monogram of the Achaean League with abbreviations of the name of the mint and magistrate's monograms in the angles. Clerk, Coins of the Achaean League, No. 244? Plate X, 16. The upper monogram, judging from his plate, has been misread by Clerk. It seems to be a combination of the letters upsilon and gamma. image 1.81.

24.* Similar. Clerk, No. 273, Plate XI, 43. image 2.09.

25. Similar. Clerk, No. 272, Plate XI, 42. image 1.69.

26. Similar. Clerk, No. 273, Compare with No. 23. image 1.29.

27. Similar. Clerk, No. 254, Plate X, 25. image 2.00.

28. Similar. Clerk, No. 247, Plate X, 19. image 1.91.

29. Similar. Clerk, No. 278. image 1.63.

30.* Similar; head 1. Clerk, No. 270, Plate XI, 40. image 1.665.

31. Similar. Apparently not in Clerk's list. The upper monogram appears to be a pi or gamma combined with N. image 1.88.

Pallantium

32. Similar. Clerk, Coins of the Achaean League, No. 220, Plate IX, 4. image 2.02.


ROMAN EMPIRE—DENARII

Nero 54–68 A. D.

34.* Head laur r. IMP Nero Caesar AVGUSTVS.

℞ IVPPITER CVSTOS Jupiter seated l., holding sceptre and thunderbolt. Matt.-Syd. I, p. 148, No. 46. image 2.98.

35. Nero Caesar AVGVSTVS otherwise same as 34. Matt.-Syd. No. 45.

Galba 68–69

36.* IMP SER Galba AVG Head r. bare.

℞ In wreath of oak: SPQR

O B

C S

image 3.21. A rare coin; not in Matt.-Syd. (cf. I, p. 201, No. 20) nor in B. M. C. Coins of the Roman Empire. The bare head of the obv. not found with this ℞.

Otho 69 A. D.

37. IMP Otho CAE[SARA]VG TRP Head bare r.

℞ PAX ORBIS TERRAR[VM] Pax standing 1. with branch and caduceus. image 3.27. Matt.-Syd. I, p. 219, No. 3.

38.* Similar.

℞ SECVRITAS P R Securitas standing l. with wreath and sceptre. Matt.-Syd. No. 12. image 3.28.

Vitellius 69 A. D.

39. [A VITE]LLIVS GERMAN IMP[ . . . ] Head r. laur.

℞ CONCORDIA P R. Concordia seated 1. hold- ing patera and cornucopiae. image 2.83. Matt.-Syd. I, p. 224 No. 1.

40.* A VITELLIVS G[ERMAN]IMP TRP Head r. laur.

℞ LIBERTAS RESTITVTA Libertas standing r. holding pileus and sceptre. Matt.-Syd. No. 18. image 2.91.

Vespasian 69–79

41. IMP Caesar VESPASIANVS AVG Head r. laur.

℞ COS ITER FORT RED Fortuna standing l. holding rudder and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. II, p. 15, No. 4. 69–71. image 3.00.

42.* [IMP] Caesar VESPASIANVS AVG Head r. laur.

℞ COS ITER TR POT Mars striding r., carrying trophy and spear. Matt.-Syd. No. 7. 69–71. image 3.04.

43 and 44. Same inscriptions. ℞ Pax seated l. holding branch and caduceus. Matt.-Syd. No. 10. 69–71. image 2.91, 2.90.

45. IMP CAES VESP AVG P M Head r. laur.

℞ AVGVR TRI POT In between, simpulum, aspergil, jug, lituus. Matt.-Syd. No. 30 70–2. image 2.63.

46. IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII Head r. laur.

℞ as on 45. Matt.-Syd. No. 42. 72–3. image 2.86.

47 and 48. IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII Head r. laur.

℞ TRI POT Vesta seated l., holding simpulum. Matt.-Syd. No. 49. 72–3. image 3.33, 2.77 (clipped).

49. Same.

℞ VICTORIA AVGVSTI Victory advancing r. with palm, about to place wreath on trophy. Matt.-Syd. No. 52. 72–3. image 2.64 (mended).

50. IMP CAES VESP AVG CENS Head r. laur.

℞ PONTIF MAXIM Vespasian seated r. holding branch and sceptre. Matt.-Syd. No. 65. 73 A. D. image 2.62.

51. IMP Caesar VESPASIANVS AVG Head r. laur.

℞ PON MAX TR P COS V winged caduceus upright. Matt.-Syd. No. 75. 74 A. D. image 2.83.

52.* Same.

℞ PON MAX TR P COS VI Pax seated l., holding branch. Matt.-Syd. No. 90. 75 A. D. image 2.75.

53. Same.

℞ Same. Victory standing l. on prow, holding wreath and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 93. 75 A. D. image 2.56.

54. Same.

℞ Insc. illegible; either [COS VII] or [COS VIII]; i. e., 76 or 77–8 A. D. Cf. Matt.-Syd. II, pp. 25ff. image 2.86.

55. Same.

℞ COS VII Eagle facing front, on cippus, head l. Matt.-Syd. No. 99. 76 A. D. image 2.78 (mended).

56. Same.

℞ COS VIII Mars standing l. with spear and trophy. Matt.-Syd. No. 103. 77–8. image 2.93.

57.* Same. Head l. laur.

℞ COS VIII Prow r., above, star. Matt.-Syd. No. 108. 77–8. image 3.28.

58. CAE[SAR] VESPASIANVS AVG Head r. laur.

℞ [IMP XIX] Modius with corn ears. Matt.-Syd. No. no. 77–8. image 2.86.

5961. IMP Caesar VESPASIANVS AVG Head r. laur.

℞ IOVIS CVSTOS Jupiter standing l., sacrificing from patera over altar and holding sceptre. Matt.-Syd. No. 124. 75–79. image 2.87, 3.02, 2.94.

62.* Caesar VESPASIANVS AVG Head l laur.

℞ ANNONA AVG Annona seated l., holding corn ears on lap with r., l. hand on hip. A type not in Cohen (cf. No. 28), nor in Matt.-Syd. (cf. No. 131b). 78–9. image 2.96.

63. Same. Head r. laur. Same ℞. image 2.63 (broken.)

Titus—Struck under Vespasian

64. T CAESA[R VESP]ASIANVS Head r. laur.

℞ [ANNONA]AVG Annona seated l., ears of corn in lap. Matt.-Syd. II p. 39, No. 218. 78–9 image 2.96.

Domitian—Struck under Vespasian

65. Caesar AVG F DO[MITIANVS] [or COS III?] Head r. laur. 74–76.

℞ Stuck to coin of Achaean League, v. No. 33, above.

66. Caesar AVG F DOMITIANVS Head r. laur.

℞ COS IIII Pegasus r. Matt.-Syd. No. 238. 76 A. D. image 2.91.

67. Caesar AVG F DOMITIANVS COS [V or VI?] Head r. laur.

℞ PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS Salus standing r. leaning on cippus and feeding snake. Matt.-Syd. Nos. 239 or 243. 77–9. image 2.96.

68. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS Head r. laur.

℞ COS V Wolf l. with twins. Matt.-Syd. No. 241b. 77–8. image 2.73 (broken).

69. Same.

℞ Same. Helmeted horseman, prancing r., r. hand raised. Matt.-Syd. No. 242. 77–8. image 2.93.

Titus 79–81 A. D.

70. IMP TITVS CAES Vespasian AVG PM Head r. laur.

℞ TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP Elephant l. Matt.-Syd. II p. 119 No. 22. Jan. 1–July 1, 80 A. D. image 2.83.

71 and 72. Same.

℞ Same. Draped table, on which winged thun- derbolt. Matt.-Syd. No. 23b. Same date, image 2.90, 3.16.

73. Same.

℞ Same. Dolphin twined round anchor. Matt.-Syd. No. 26b. Same date, image 2.90.

74.* Same.

℞ BONVS EVENTVS AVGVSTI Bonus Eventus standing naked l. holding corn-ears and patera. Matt.-Syd. No. 31 (Rare). 79–80. image 2.81.

75 and 76. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS Head of Vespasian r. laur.

℞ S.C on shield supported by two capricorns; below, a globe. Matt.-Syd. II p. 123, No. 63. 80–81. m 2.90, 2.87.

Domitian—Struck under Titus

77. CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII Head r. laur.

℞ PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS Helmet on throne. Matt.-Syd. II p. 122 No. 51. 80 and later, image 3.10.

Julia, Daughter of Titus

78.* IVLIA AVGUSTA TITI AVGVSTI F Bust r. draped.

℞ VENVS AVGVST Venus standing r. leaning on cippus, holding helmet and spear. 80–81. image 3.07. An unusual specimen; cf. Matt.-Syd. II p. 122, No. 56, Pl. III, 55 where she holds helmet and spear; also Cohen No. 14.

Domitian 81–96 A. D.

79.* IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM Head r. laur.

TR POT II COS VIIII DES X PP Minerva standing r. with shield and javelin. A rare combination, not listed in Matt.-Syd. (II, p. 158) or Cohen. 83 A. D. image 2.99.

80. Same.

Same. Minerva with shield and javelin r. on prow, on which, owl. Mat.-Syd. (No. 36) assigns this type to image only; but v. Cohen, No. 606. 83 A. D. image 3.05.

81. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP V Head r. laur.

IMP XI COS XII CENS PPP Minerva l. with thunderbolt and spear; at feet, a shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 75. 86 A. D. image 3.25,

82. Same.

IMP XII COS XII CENS PP Minerva l., r. on spear, l. on hip. Matt.-Syd. No. 82. 86 A. D. image 3.18.

83. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP VI Head r. laur.

IMP XII COS XII CENS PPP Minerva l., spear in r., l. hand on hip. Type-combination not listed in Matt.-Syd. (II, p. 164) nor in Cohen. 86 A. D. image 3.11.

84. Same.

IMP XIIII COS XII CENS PPP Minerva l. with spear in r., l. on hip. Rare combination; noted only on an aureus by Matt.-Syd. II p. 164, note. 86 A. D. image 3.24.

85. Same.

IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS PPP Minerva r. with javelin and shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 91. 87 A. D. image 3.37.

86. Same.

Same. Minerva r. on prow, with javelin and shield; on prow, owl. Matt.-Syd. No. 92. 87 A. D. image 3.17 (chipped.) .

87. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP VII Head r. laur.

IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P PP Same type. Cohen No. 236; Matt.-Syd. (No. 108) gives this combination with GERMAN on the obv. 88 A. D. image 3.26.

88. Same.

Same. Minerva 1. with thunderbolt and spear; behind, shield on ground. Matt.-Syd. No. 109. 88 A. D. image 3.45.

89. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP VIII Head r. laur.

IMP XIX COS XIIII CENS P PP Minerva r., with javelin and shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 137. 88–9. image 2.98 (chipped).

90. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM [TRP??] Head r. laur.

IMP XXI COS XV CENS P PP Minerva l., r. hand on spear, l. on hip. Matt.-Syd. pp. 171–2. 90–1. image 2.73 (broken).

91. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP VIIII Head r. laur.

IMP XXI COS XV CENS P PP Minerva r. brandishing javelin and shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 147. 90 A. D. image 3.08.

92. Same.

Same. Minerva r. on prow, brandishing javelin; on prow, owl. Matt.-Syd. No. 148. 90 A. D. image 3.20.

93. Same.

Same. Minerva l. holding thunderbolt and spear; at feet, a shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 149. 90 A. D. image 3.20.

94 and 95. Same.

Same. Minerva l., spear in l., r. on hip. Matt.-Syd. No. 150. 90 A. D. image 3.34, 2.90.

96–100. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP X Head r. laur.

IMP XXI COS XV CENS P PP Minerva r., brandishing javelin and holding shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 152. 90–1. image 3.34, 3.20, 3.05, 3.15, 3.44.

101. Same.

Same. Minerva r. on prow as before. Matt.-Syd. No. 153. 90–91. image 3.17.

102. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XI Head r. laur.

IMP XXI COS XV CENS P PP Minerva r. with shield and javelin. Matt.-Syd. No. 156. 91 A. D. image 3.16.

103 and 104. Same.

Minerva and owl on prow as before. Matt.-Syd. No. 157. 91 A. D. image 3.30, 3.13.

105 and 106. Same.

IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P PP Minerva r. with javelin and shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 166. 92 A. D. image 3.30, 3.64.

107–109. Same.

Same. Minerva l., holding thunderbolt and spear; at feet, shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 168. 92 A. D. image 3.23, 3.18, 3.27.

110–114. Same.

Same. Minerva l., holding spear in r., l. on hip. Matt.-Syd. No. 169. 92 A. D. image 3.37, 3.15, 3.26, 3.31, 3.37.

115. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XII Head r. laur.

IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P PP Minerva r. with javelin and spear. Matt.-Syd. No. 171. 92–3. 3.31.

116. Same.

Same. Minerva r. on prow with owl, as before. Matt.-Syd. No. 172. 92–3. image 3.24.

117 and 118. Same.

Same Minerva l., spear in r., l. on hip. Matt.-Syd. No. 174. 92–3. image 3.66, 3.04.

119 and 120. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XIII Head r. laur.

IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P PP Minerva r., brandishing javelin and holding shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 175. 93–4. image 3.09, 3.22.

121–123. Same.

Same. Minerva on prow as before. Matt.-Syd. No. 176. 93–4. image 3.10, 3.39, 3.24.

124. Same.

Same. Minerva l., holding thunderbolt and spear. Matt.-Syd. No. 177. 93–4. image 3.00.

125–128. Same.

Same. Minerva l., spear in r. hand, l. on hip. Matt.-Syd. No. 178. 93–4. image 3.29, 3.31, 2.92, 3.11.

129. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XIIII Head r. laur.

IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P PP Minerva l., spear in r., l. on hip. Matt.-Syd. No. 180. 94 A. D. image 2.99.

130. Same.

IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P PP Minerva r. on prow with owl, as before. Matt.-Syd. No. 187. 95 A. D. image 3.34.

131–132. IMP CAES DOMIT GERM PM TRP XV Head r. laur.

℞Same. Matt.-Syd. No. 191. 95–6 image 3.27, 3.30.

133. Same.

Same. Matt.-Syd. No. 193. 95–6. image 3.28

134.* Same.

IMP XXII COS [XVII?CEN]S P PP Minerva Victrix flying l. with spear and shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 194. 95–6. image 3.38.

135. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XVI Head r. laur.

Same. Minerva l. holding thunderbolt and spear. Matt.-Syd. No. 197. 96 A. D. image 3.13.

136.* Same.

Same. Minerva l., spear in r., l. on hip. This combination not listed in Cohen nor in Matt.-Syd. 96 A. D. image 3.17.

137. Same.

Same. Minerva r. with javelin and shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 197b. 96 A. D. image 3.37.

Domitia

138* DOMI]TIA AVGVSTA IMP DOMIT Bust draped r, hair in long domed queue.

PIETAS AVGVST Pietas seated l. with sceptre; in front, child. Matt.-Syd. II p.. 180, No. 214. 82–3 and later, image 2.57.

Nerva 96–98 A. D.

139.* IMP NERVA CAES AVG PM TRP COS II PP Head r. laur.

AEQUITAS AVGVST Aequitas l., with cornucopiae and scales. Matt.-Syd. II p. 223, No. 1. 96 A. D. image 3.30.

140.* Same.

CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM Clasped hands. Matt.-Syd. No. 2. 96 A. D. image 3.12.

141. Same.

FORTVNA AVGVST Fortuna l. with rudder and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 4. 96 A. D. image 3.00.

142. IMP NERVA CAES AVG PONT MAX TRP Head r. laur.

COS II DESIGN III PP Priestly emblems. Matt.-Syd. No. 12. 96 A. D. image 3.38.

143–144. IMP NERVA CAES AVG PM TRP COS III PP Head r. laur.

CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM Clasped hands. Matt.-Syd. No. 14. 97 A. D. image 3.26, 2.92.

145 and 146. Same.

Same. Clasped hands holding legionary eagle on prow. Matt.-Syd. No. 15. 97 A. D. image 3.13, 3.32.

147 and 148. Same.

FORTVNA AVGVST Fortuna l., with rudder and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 16. 97 A. D. image 3.31, 3.01.

149. Same.

FORTUNA P R Fortuna seated l., with sceptre and ears of corn. Matt.-Syd. No. 17. 97 A. D. image 3.18.

150–152. Same.

LIBERTAS PUBLICA Libertas l., with pileus and sceptre. Matt.-Syd. No. 19. 97 A. D. image 3.14, 3.11, 3.45.

153–154. Same.

SALVS PVBLICA Salus seated l. with cornears. Matt.-Syd. No. 20. 97 A. D. image 3.49, 3.38.

155–158. IMP NERVA CAES AVG PM TR POT Head r. laur.

COS III PATER PATRIAE Priestly emblems. Matt.-Syd. No. 24. 97 A. D. image 3.19, 3.32, 3.30, 3.32.

159. IMP NERVA CAES AVG PM TR P II COS III PP Head r. laur.

AEQUITAS AVG Aequitas 1. with scales and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 25. 97 A. D. image 3.10.

160. Same.

CONCORDIA EXER[CITVVM] Clasped hands, holding legionary eagle, resting on prow. Matt.-Syd. No. 27. 97 A. D. image 3.29.

161. Same.

FORTUNA AVGVST Fortuna holding rudder and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 28. 97 A. D. image 3.22.

162. IMP NERVA CAES AVG PM TR POT II Head r. laur.

COS III PATER PATRIAE Priestly emblems. Matt.-Syd. No. 34. 97 A. D. image 3.59.

Trajan 98–117

163. IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM Head r. laur.

PM TRP COS II PP Concordia seated before altar with patera and double cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. II, p. 245, No. 2; Strack, 21. 98–9. image 3.25.

164. Same.

Same. Pax l. with olive branch and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 6; Strack, 24. 98–9. image 3.00.

165 and 166. Same.

Same. Vesta seated l. holding patera and torch. Matt.-Syd. No. 9; Strack, 27. 98–9. image 2.92, 2.74.

167.* Same.

PONT MAX TRPOT COS II Abundantia seated l. on chair, arms of which are crossed cornuacopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 11; Strack, 15. 98–9. image 3.08.

168–170. Same.

Same. Concordia seated l. holding patera and double cornucopiae; before her, an altar. Matt.-Syd. No. 12; Strack, 10. 98–9. image 3.05, 3.24, 3.44.

171 and 172. Same.

Same. Vesta seated l. holding patera and torch. Matt.-Syd. No. 21; Strack, 16. 98–9. image 3.32, 2.88.

173. Same.

Same. Victory seated l., holding patera and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 22; Strack, 20. 98–9. image 3.14.

174.* Same.

PM TRP COS III PP Abundantia seated on chair, arms of which are crossed cornuacopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 32; Strack, 34. 100 A. D. image 3.29.

175. Same.

Same. Concordia seated l. with patera and double cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 33; Strack, 29. 100 A. D. image 2.85.

176. Same. Head r. laur. and aegis.

℞ Same. Pax standing l. with olive branch and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 38 (But Matt, mentions no aegis on obv.); Strack, 33. 100 A. D. image 2.58.

177–179. Same without aegis on obverse. image 2.70 (broken), 2.89, 3.15.

180–182. Same. (181 has aegis on obv.)

℞ Same. Victory seated l. holding patera and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 41; Strack, 38. 100 A. D. image 2.83, 2.81, 2.67.

183* and 184. Same. (183 has aegis.)

PM TRP COS IIII PP Hercules standing front on altar, holding club and lion's skin. Matt.-Syd. No. 49; Strack, 40. 101–2. image 2.99, 2.81.

185. Same.

Same. Pax l., with cornucopiae and olive branch. Matt.-Syd. No. 56; Strack, Anhang iv, 14. 101–2. image 3.20.

186–188. Same. (188 has aegis on obv.)

Same. Victory standing front, head l., halfdraped, holding wreath and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 58; Strack, 48. 101–2. image 2.13, 3.00, 3.04.

189–192. Same. (192 with aegis.)

Same. Victory walking l., holding wreath and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 60; Strack, 49. 101–2. image 2.49 (broken), 3.02, 2.88, 2.85.

193. Same, (aegis.)

Same. Victory walking r., head l, holding wreath and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 64; Strack, 48. 101–2. image 3.18.

194. Same, (aegis.)

Same. Victory standing l. at altar, holding wreath and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 67; Strack, 47. 101–2. image 3.01.

195. Same. (dr. l. s.) IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TRP.

AET AVG (across field); COS V PP SPQR OPTIMO PRINC Aeternitas standing holding heads representing the sun and moon. Matt.-Syd. No. 91; Strack, 154. 103–111. image 2.98.

196–201.* Same. (dr. l. s.)

DAC CAP (in ex.) COS V PP SPQR OPTIMO PRINC Dacian seated l. on pile of arms. Cf. Matt.-Syd. No. 96, where he is seated r. only. So also Cohen, No. 118; Strack, 157. 103–111. image 2.98, 2.87, 3.02, 3.00, 3.16, 2.85.

202–205. Same. (dr. l. s.)

DANVVIVS (in ex.) COS V PP SPQR OPTIMO PRINC The Danube reclining l. on rocks; above, cloak floating; his l. arm resting on urn; r. on ship's prow. Matt.-Syd. No. 100; Strack, 159. 103–111. image 2.69, 3.19, 2.89, 2.94.

206 and 207. Same. (dr. l. s.)

PAX (in ex.) COS V PP SPQR OPTIMO PRINC Pax standing l. with cornucopiae, setting fire to pile of shields. Matt.-Syd. No. 102; Strack, 160. 103–111. image 2.92, 2.64 (broken).

208 and 209. Same. (dr. l. s.)

PIET (in ex.) same inscr. Pietas veiled, standing l. by altar, holding patera and sceptre. Matt.-Syd. No. 104; Strack, 161. 103–11. image 2.92, 2.88.

210. Same. (dr. l. s.)

COS V PP SPQR OPTIMO PRINC Mars walking l. holding a Victory and trophy. Matt.-Syd. No. 114; Strack, 124. 103–11. image 1.67.

211. Same. (dr. l. s.)

Same. Roma standing l., holding Victory and spear. Matt.-Syd. No. 115; Strack, 133. 103–11. image 2.94.

212–213. Same. (dr. l. s.)

Same. Roma seated l., holding Victory and spear. Matt.-Syd. No. 116; Strack, 132. 103–11. image 3.07, 3.15.

214*–219. Same. Head laur. r. draped.

Same. Aequitas standing l. holding cornucopiae and scales. Matt.-Syd. No. 118 (gives only image for this type); Strack, 144. 103–11. image 2.59, 3.07, 2.95, 2.76, 2.88, 3.02.

220–221. Same.

Same. Aequitas seated l. with scales and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 119; Strack, 145. 103–11. image 3.00, 2.95.

222–224. Same.

Same. Felicitas standing l. holding caduceus and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 121; Strack, 147. 103–11. image 2.84, 2.88, 2.54 (clipped).

225–227. Same.

Same. Draped female figures (Spes) standing l. holding patera in r., drapery in l. Matt.-Syd. No. 127; Strack, 151. 103–11. image 3.02, 2.95, 3.12.

228. Same.

Same. Fortuna standing l. holding cornucopiae and rudder on prow. Matt.-Syd. No. 122; Strack, 149. 103–11. image 3.01.

229 and 230. Same.

Same. Pax standing l. leaning on a column, holding olive-branch. Matt.-Syd. No. 126; Strack, 148. 103–11. image 2.82, 3.20.

231*–235. Same.

Same. Victory fully draped standing l. holding wreath and palm. Not in Matt.-Syd. or Cohen. 103–11. image 2.92, 2.79, 3.13, 3.28, 2.59. The fully draped figure is apparently unique.

236–241. Same.

Same. Victory half-draped l. holding wreath and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 128; Strack, 128. 103–11. image 2.92, 2.75, 3.03, 3.20, 2.82, 2.95.

242. Same.

Same. Victory fully draped standing l. on two shields. Matt.-Syd. No. 129; Strack, 127. 103–11. image 2.75.

243–246. Same.

Same. Victory r., inscribing on a shield fixed to a trophy:

DA/CI/CA in three lines

Matt.-Syd. No. 130; Strack, 131. 103–11. image 2.54, 2.90, 3.02, 3.11.

247. Same.

Same. Victory walking l., holding wreath and palm. Matt.-Syd. No. 131; Strack, 126. 103–11. image 3.00.

248–250. Same.

Same. Arabia standing l., holding branch and bundle of cinnamon sticks; at her feet, a camel l. Matt.-Syd. No. 142; Strack, 153. 103–11. image 2.93, 2.89, 2.77.

251.* Same.

Same. Trophy of arms: one round and two hexagonal shields; at base, two javelins and round shield on l.; two swords and hexagonal shield on r. Cf. Matt.-Syd. No. 147b, from which this and the six following coins present some interesting variations. Strack, 140. 103–11. image 2.97.

252.* Same.

Same. At base, javelin on either side; at l., hexagonal, at r., round shield. 103–11. image 2.81.

253 and 254. Same.

Same. At base, at r., two javelins and hexagonal shield; at l., sword and round shield. 103–11. image 3.03, 3.09.

255. Same.

Same. At base, on l., two javelins and hexagonal shield; r., two swords and round shield. 103–11. image 2.99.

256 and 257. Same.

Same. At base, sword and round shield; r., two javelins and hexagonal shield. 103–11. image 3.07, 2.97.

258. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TRP COS V PP Bust draped r., Aegis.

℞ S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI Mars nude, walking r., holding spear and trophy. Matt.-Syd. No. 156. 103–11. image 2.54.

259. Same inscr.

℞ Same inscr. Bust draped, r.

Same. Mars r. holding spear, and resting on shield. Matt.-Syd. No. 161; Strack, 88. 103–11. image 2.52.

260. Same.

Same. Aequitas l. holding scales and double cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 169; Strack, 101. 103–11. image 2.99.

261. Same.

Same. Pax seated l., holding branch and sceptre; at feet, kneeling Dacian. Matt.-Syd. No. 187; Strack, 94. image 3.09. 103–11.

262 and 263. Same (aegis).

℞ Same. Felicitas standing l. before altar holding caduceus and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 173. 103–11. image 3.18, 3.32.

264. Same (aegis).

℞ Same. Dacia seated r. in mournful attitude on shield; beneath, curved sword. Matt.-Syd. No. 218. 103–11. image 3.09.

265–267. Same (aegis).

℞ Same. Dacia seated r. at foot of trophy. Matt.-Syd. No. 220; Strack, 85. 103–11. image 2.84, 3.00, 2.79.

268. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER PM TRP COS V DES VI [PP] Bust r. dr. (aegis).

Same, in ex.: VESTA. Vesta seated l. with palladium and sceptre. Matt.-Syd. No. 237. 111 A. D. image 2.80.

269. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TRP COS VI PP Head r. dr. (aegis)

S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI In ex.: ALIM ITAL Abundantia standing l. holding ears of corn and cornucopiae; at her feet, a child standing. Matt.-Syd. No. 243; Strack, 172–3. 112–4. image 2.81.

270. Same.

Same. In ex.: ARAB ADQ Arabia standing front, head l., holding forth in r. a branch, in l., a bunch of cinnamon sticks; at her feet, an ostrich. Matt.-Syd. No. 244; Strack, 174. 112–4. image 3.06.

271. Same.

Same. In ex.: PAX Pax standing l. with cornucopiae, setting fire to pile of shields. Matt.-Syd. No. 259; Strack, 176. 112–4. image 2.81.

272. Same. Head r., undraped.

Same. In ex.: VESTA. Vesta seated l., holding palladium and sceptre. Matt.-Syd. No 265. 112–4. image 2.61.

273. Same. Head r., both shoulders draped.

SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI Mars nude, walking r. with spear and trophy. Matt.-Syd. No. 269; Strack, 187. 112–4. image 2.89.

274 and 275. Same.

Same. Felicitas l. with caduceus and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 271; Strack, 186. 112–4. image 2.81, 2.88.

276 and 277. Same.

Same. Genius standing r., holding patera and ears of corn. Matt.-Syd. No. 275; Strack, 184. 112–4. image 2.74, 2.91.

278* Same.

Same. Trajan on horseback l., holding a Victory and spear. Matt.-Syd. No. 291; Strack, 196. 112–4. image 2.86.

279–283. Same. (Bust r. laur. dr. and cuir.)

Same. Eagle between two standards. Cf. Matt.-Syd. No. 296, who gives this type only for image Strack, 195. image 2.84, 3.02, 2.83, 2.79, 3.23.

284–285* and 286. IMP TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC PM TR P Bust r. laur. draped.

COS VI PP SPQR Genius standing l., holding patera and ears of corn. Matt.-Syd. No. 303; Strack, 222. 114–7. image 3.04, 2.80, 3.38.

287. IMP CAES NER TRAIAN OPTIM AVG GER DAC Head laur. r. dr.

FORT RED (in ex.) [ ] VI PP SPQR Fortuna seated l., holding rudder and cornucopiae. Cf. Matt.-Syd. Nos. 315 or 317; Strack, 257. 114–7. image 2.84.

288. IMP TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC [PM TR P] Head r. laur. dr.

FORT RED (in ex.) COS VI PP SPQR Fortuna seated l., holding cornucopiae and rudder. Matt.-Syd. No. 308; Strack, 221. 114–7. image 2.61.

289. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC Head r. laur. dr.

PM TRP COS V SPQR Felicitas standing l., holding caduceus and cornucopiae. Matt.-Syd. No. 343; Strack, 228. 114–7. image 2.81.

290. Same. (dr. and cuir.)

Same. FORT RED (in ex.) Fortuna seated l., holding cornucopiae and rudder. Matt.-Syd. No. 319 (gives only image for this combination). 114–7. image 2.85.

291 and 292. Same. (dr. and cuir.)

PM TRP COS VI PP SPQR Mars walking r. with spear and trophy (?). Matt.-Syd. No. 337; Strack, 230. 114–7. image 2.92, 2.70.

293 and 294. Same. dr. and cuir. r.

Same. Trajan's column surmounted by statue; on base, two eagles. Matt.-Syd. No. 356; Strack, 234. 114–7 image 3.52, 2.69.

Matidia

295.* Bust r. draped. MATIDIA AVG DIVAE MAR[CIANAE F].

PIETAS [AVG]VST Matidia standing facing, head l., placing her hands on the heads of Sabina and Matidia the younger. Matt.-Syd. No. 759. image 2.32 (broken).


MINT OF CAESAREA IN CAPPADOCIA

Trajan

296. AϒT KAIΣ NEP TPAIAN [ΣEB ΓEPM] Head r. laur.

℞ ΔHMAPX EΞ ϒПAT Г Head of Zeus Ammon r., bearded and horned. B. M. C. Gal., etc. p. 53, no. 56. 100 A. D. image quinarius 1.58.

297* and 298.* Same. Larger flan.

℞ Same. Denarius. 100 A. D. image 3.51, 3.35.

299. AϒTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIAN CEB ГEPM ΔAK Head r., laur.

℞ ΔHMAPX EΞimage† ϒПAT image† Arabia standing front, looking l., in her r., a branch, in l., a sword in sheath (?); in front, camel. B. M. C. Gal. etc., p. 54, No. 64. 112 A. D. image denarius 2.05 (hole).

300. Coin of Caesarea stuck to broken piece of coin of Rhodes, v. No. 5 supra, image.

† The letter vau, Greek numeral for six.


BACK

NOTES

End Notes

1 Tac. Ann. II, 59, 4: Augustus inter alia dominationis arcana .... seposuit Aegyptum.
2 Mitteis-Wilcken, Papyruskunde, I,. l (Grundz�ge) p. lxvi. Segr�, Metrologia e Circolazione, p. 417.
3 Milne, in Annals of Arch, and Anthrop. VII, p. 52.
4 Quoted by Milne, l. c., in 1914; the records of the Amer. Numis. Society fail to show any finds of importance since then to the present date.
5 Archiv f. Papyrusforschung, I, p. 272 ff.
6 Segr�, op cit. p. 417.
7 B. V. Head, in B. M. Cat., Caria p. cxiv. f.
8 Wilcken, U., Papyruskunde, I, l, p. lxv; id. Griechische Ostraka, I, p. 728.
9 Heichelheim, Fritz, Zu Pap. Bad. 37, ein Beitrag zur römischen Geldgeschichte unter Trajan, in Klio, 25, (1932) pp. 124–131. This article was called to the writer's attention by Mr. Newell.
10 P. L. Strack, Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichspr�gung des zweiten Jahrhunderts. Teil I, Die Reichspr�gung zur Zeit des Trajan. Stuttgart, Kohlhammer, 1931.

EGYPTIAN HOARD

PLATE I

PLATE I - 7

image

7

PLATE I - 15

image

15

PLATE I - 23

image

23

PLATE I - 6

image

6

PLATE I - 24

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24

PLATE I - 30

image

30

PLATE I - 34

image

34

PLATE I - 36

image

36

PLATE I - 38

image

PLATE I - 40

image

PLATE I - 5

image

PLATE I - 42

image

PLATE I - 52

image

PLATE I - 57

image

PLATE II

PLATE I - 62

image

62

PLATE II - 74

image

74

PLATE II - 78

image

78

PLATE II - 79

image

79

PLATE II - 134

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134

PLATE II - 136

image

136

PLATE II - 138

image

138

PLATE II - 139

image

139

PLATE II - 140

image

140

PLATE II - 174

image

174

PLATE II - 167

image

167

PLATE II - 183

image

183

PLATE II - 201

image

201

PLATE II - 214

image

214

PLATE III

PLATE III - 251

image

251

PLATE III - 231

image

231

PLATE III - 252

image

252

PLATE III - 295

image

295

PLATE III - 278

image

278

PLATE III - 285

image

285

PLATE III - 297

image

297

PLATE III - 298

image

298


Numismatic Notes and Monographs

  • Sydney P. Noe. Coin Hoards. 1921. 47 pp. 6 pls. 50c.
  • Anges Balwdin. Five Roman Gold Medallions. 1921. 103 pp. 8 pls. $1.50.
  • Sydney P. Noe. Medallic Work of A. A. Wein man. 1921. 31 pp. 17 pls. $1.00.
  • Gilbert S. Perez. The Mint of the Philippine Islands. 1921. 8 pp. 4 pls. 50c.
  • David Eugene Smith, LE.D. Computing Jetons. 1921. 70 pp. 25 pls. $1.50.
  • Edward T. Newell. The First Seleucid Coinage of Tyre. 1921. 40 pp. 8 pls. $1.00.
  • Howland Wood. Gold Dollars of 1858. 1922. 7 pp. 2 pls. 50c.
  • R. B. Whitehead. Pre-Mohammedan Coinage of N. W. India. 1922. 56 pp. 15 pls. $2.00.
  • George F. Hill. Attambelos I of Characene. 1922. 12 pp. 3 pls. $1.00.
  • M. P. Vlasto. Taras Oikistes (A Contribution to Tarcntine Numismatics). 234 pp. 13 pls. $3.50.
  • Anges Balwdin. Six Roman Bronze Medallions. 1923. 39 pp. 6 pls. $1.50.
  • Howland Wood. Tegucigalpa Coinage of 1823. 1923. 16 pp. 2 pls. 50c.
  • Edward T. Newell. Alexander Hoards—II. Demanhur Hoard. 1923. 162 pp. 8 pls. $2.50.
  • Harrold E. Gillingham. Italian Orders of Chivalry and Medals of Honour. 146 pp. 34 pls. $2.00.
  • Edward T. Newell. Alexander Hoards—III. Andritsaena. 1924. 39 pp. 6 pls. $1.00.
  • C. T. Seltman. A Hoard from Side. 1924. 20 pp. 3 pls. $1.00.
  • R. B. Seager. A Cretan Coin Hoard. 1924. 55 pp. 12 pls. $2.00.
  • Samuel R. Milbank. The Coinage of Aegina. 1925. 66 pp. 5 pls. $2.00.
  • Sydney P. Noe. A Bibliography of Greek Coin Hoards. 1925. 275 pp. $2.50.
  • Edward T. Newell. Mithradates of Partliia and Hyspaosines of Characene. 18 pp. 2 pls. 50c.
  • Sydney P. Noe. The Mende (Kaliandra) Hoard. 1926. 73 pp. 10 pls. $2.00.
  • Anges Balwdin. Four Medallions from the Arras Hoard. 1926. 36 pp. 4 pls. $1.50.
  • H. Alexander Parsons. The Earliest Coins of Norway. 1926. 41 pp. 50c.
  • Edward T. Newell. Some Unpublished Coins of Eastern Dynasts. 1926. 21 pp. 2 pls. 50c.
  • Harrold E. Gillingham. Spanish Orders of Chivalry and Decorations of Honour. 1926. 165 pp. 40 pls. $3.00.
  • Sydney P. Noe. The Coinage of Mesapontum. 1927 (Part I). 134 pp. 23 pls. $3.00.
  • Edward T. Newell. Two Recent Egyptian Hoards—Delta and Keneh. 34 pp. 3 pls. $1.00.
  • Edward Rogers. The Second and Third Seleucid Coinage of Tyre. 1927. 33 pp. 4 pls. $1.50.
  • Alfred R. Bellinger. The Anonymous Byzantine Bronze Coinage. 1928. 27 pp. 4 pls. $1.50.
  • Harrold E. Gillingham. Notes on the Decorations and Medals of the French Colonies and Protectorates. 1928. 62 pp. 31 pls. $2.00.
  • Oscar Ravel. The "Colts" of Ambracia. 1928. 180 pp. 19 pls. $3.00.
  • Howland Wood. The Coinage of the Mexican Revolutionists. 1928. 53 pp. 15 pls. $2.50.
  • Edward T. Newell. Alexander Hoards. IV. Olympia. 1929. 31 pp. 9 pls. $1.50.
  • Allen B. West. Fifth–Fourth Century Gold Coins from Thracian Coast. 1929. 183 pp. 16 pls. $3.00.
  • Gilbert S. Perez. The Leper Colony Currency of Culion. 1929. 10 pp. 3 pls. 50c.
  • Alfred R. Bellinger. Two Hoards of Attic Bronze Coins. 1930. 14 pp. 4 pls. 50c.
  • D. H. Cox. The Caparelli Hoard. 1930. 17 pp. 2 pls. 50c.
  • George F. Hill. On the Coins of Narbonensis with Iberian Inscriptions. 39 pp. 6 pls. $1.00.
  • Bauman L. Belden. A Mint in New York City. 1930. 40 pp. 4 pls. 50c.
  • Edward T. Newell. The K�ch�k K�hne Hoard. 1931. 33 pp. 4 pls. $1.00.
  • Sydney P. Noe. The Coinage of Metapontum Part II. 1931. 134 pp. 43 pls. $3.00.
  • D. W. Valentine. The United States Half Dimes. 1931. 79 pp. 47 pls. $5.00.
  • A. R. Bellinger. Two Roman Hoards from Dura-Europas. 66 pp. 17 pls. $1.50.
  • George F. Hill. Notes on the Ancient Coinage of Hispania Citerior. 196 pp. 36 plates. $4.00.
  • Alan W. Hazelton. The Russian Imperial Orders. 1932. 102 pp. 20 plates. $3.00.