Pocket Change

Collectively branded as Pocket Change, the ANS publishes new content frequently on its blog, in The Planchet podcast, as well as videos. Back-issues of ANS Magazine are also available.

LT 88. Republic Crises to Imperial Ideals? A View from...
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LT 88. Republic Crises to Imperial Ideals? A View from the Roman Coinage of the 40s–30s BCE

In the numismatic field at the end of Republic, there is an emphasis of abstract personifications of values in relation to the Roman state (res publica), in which we can observe the increased association of ideals to individuals and debates concerning the ownership of particular ethical qualities, which would become a core imperial virtue. Dr. Hannah Cornwell, Roman historian and lecturer at the University of Birmingham, will outline the role of traditional ideals in debates on the nature of the Roman state during the final disintegration of the Republican political system, as communicated via the coinage. The communication and…

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Language and the Successful Circulation of Money in the United...
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Language and the Successful Circulation of Money in the United States
By Jesse Kraft

Prior to the adoption of the United States dollar with the Mint Act of 1792, the circulating medium in the…

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LT No. 86. Femina Princeps’ and her Exceptional Numismatic Accolades
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LT No. 86. Femina Princeps’ and her Exceptional Numismatic Accolades

Dr. Tracene Harvey, Director/Curator of the Museum of Antiquities at the University of Saskatchewan, explores the Roman empress Livia’s…

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Language and monetary circulation in the early United States
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Language and monetary circulation in the early United States

This study seeks to understand better the methods by which money circulated in the colonial and early Federal periods of…

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Beads in the ANS Collection: Trade Objects or Jewelry?
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Beads in the ANS Collection: Trade Objects or Jewelry?
By John Thomassen

In the world of potentially controversial topics, the idea that coins have a primary (if not singular) purpose—that is, as…

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Hersh’s Die Study of Gaius Antonius’ Denarii
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Hersh’s Die Study of Gaius Antonius’ Denarii
By The American Numismatic Society

By Liv Mariah Yarrow

I never had the pleasure of meeting Charles Hersh in his lifetime, but over these last few…

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LT No. 84. An Introduction to the Function and Design...
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LT No. 84. An Introduction to the Function and Design of Medals

ANS Fellow Scott Miller leads an overview of medallic art. While introductory presentations on medals often emphasize their history and…

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Pax Romana
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Pax Romana
By Lucia Carbone

Auferre trucidare rapere falsis nominibus imperium, atque ubi solitudinem faciunt, pacem appellant.To plunder, butcher, steal, these things they misname empire:…

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LT No. 83. The Mark & Lottie Salton Collection: Jewish...
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LT No. 83. The Mark & Lottie Salton Collection: Jewish Entrepreneurs and the Beginning of the German Coin Trade

Mark Salton (b. Max Schlessinger, 1914-2005), came from from a distinguished family of German coin dealers from before the…

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What is a Mint?
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What is a Mint?
By David Yoon

Some questions seem too obvious to be worth asking. Everyone knows that a mint is a production facility that strikes…

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LT No. 82. Coins in Shakespeare
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LT No. 82. Coins in Shakespeare

Michael Markowitz guides a merry numismatic tour through the works of William Shakespeare. From drachmas to ducats to sixpence,…

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Ancient Coins and (Modern) Object Biographies
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Ancient Coins and (Modern) Object Biographies
By Nathan Elkins

One way to study numismatic objects is through the lens of the anthropological/archaeological concept of object biography. A helpful guide…

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Laban Heath’s Improved Adjustable Compound Microscope
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Laban Heath’s Improved Adjustable Compound Microscope
By David Hill

Heath’s microscope and one of his counterfeit detectors.

The ANS Library and Archives recently acquired an interesting little gadget—one of Laban…

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