Coinage of the American Confederation Period

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(Coinage of the Americas Conference Proceedings 11, 1996)

edited by Philip L. Mossman

Hardcover, 346 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-263-1
ISBN-10: 0-89722-263-6
Price: US$25.00 (no Member discount)

This volume contains papers drawn from the Coinage of the Americas Conference (COAC) held in 1995.

Contents:

The American Confederation: The Times and Its Money (Philip L. Mossman)

The English George III Contemporary Counterfeit Halfpenny: A Statistical Study of Production and Distribution (Charles W. Smith)

The Shipwreck of the Faithful Steward: A “Missing Link” in the Export of British and Irish Halfpence (John M. Kleeberg)

New Thoughts on the Nova Constellatio Private Copper Coinage (Eric P. Newman)

Vermont Coppers: Coinage of an Independent Republic (Pete Smith)

The So-Called Atlee Broken “A” Letter Punch (John Lorenzo)

Coinage During the Confederation: Two Near Misses for Matthew Boulton (Richard G. Doty)

Coinage Featuring George Washington (George Fuld)

Medals of the Comitia Americana Series in the Collections of the American Numismatic Society and Other Public Institutions (Alan M. Stahl)

The Coinage of The Americas Conference is an annual meeting that provides a forum for exchange of knowledge on a selected theme in the numismatics of the western hemisphere.

Circulating Counterfeits of the Americas

(Coinage of the Americas Conference Proceedings 14, 2000)

edited by John M. Kleeberg

Hardcover, 227 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-279-2
ISBN-10: 0-89722-279-2

Regular Price: US$35.00
Member Price: US$24.50

(Only available for purchase through the ANS.)

This volume is a record of the Coinage of the Americas Conference (COAC) held in 1998.

Contents:

Imported and Domestic Counterfeit Copper Coins in Pre-Federal America (Philip L. Mossman and Charles W. Smith)

Counterfeiting of the Bolivian Four Soles Coins of 1830 (Horace Flatt)

NLG, Circulating Counterfeit Capped Bust Half Dollars, 1807–1839 (Keith Davignon and Bradley S. Karoleff)

Counterfeit 2 Reales of the Bust Type: Charles III, Charles IV, Ferdinand VII, 1771–1821 A Survey and Die Study (John M. Kleeberg)

The Counterfeit Spanish Two Reales: Canadian Blacksmiths or North American Tokens (John P. Lorenzo)

Adding Insult to Injury: Altered Notes of the Southern Bank of Georgia (Richard G. Doty)

Nineteenth-Century Counterfeit Detection Devices (Emmett McDonald)

Appendix 1: A Counterfeit’s Arrest Proves the Circulation of Massachusetts Silver Shillings as Late as 1784 (Eric P. Newman)

Appendix 2: Flowing Hair and Draped Bust Counterfeit Half Dollars in the ANS Collection (John M. Kleeberg)

The Coinage of the Americas Conference is an annual meeting that provides a forum for exchange of knowledge on a selected theme in the numismatics of the western hemisphere.


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Copper Coinage of the State of New Jersey

trudgen jacket 8by Damon G. Douglas, edited by Gary A. Trudgen (2004)

Hardcover, 130 pp., 3 illus.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-289-1
ISBN-10: 0-89722-289-X
List Price: $45.00 (available through the ANS only)

Read/Download via HathiTrust (Open Access).

When the American Revolutionary War ended in 1783, there was no central mint to supply the newly independent states with coinage. In fact, nearly a decade passed before Congress formed the US Mint in 1792 and attempted to unify the growing nation’s coin types. In the meantime, some of the states produced their own coins, under what were often primitive and difficult circumstances. Mute witnesses to our nation’s beginnings, these coinages have not always received the proper study they deserve. A case in point are the copper coins minted by the State of New Jersey, some of the more interesting state coinages because of their design and the circumstances under which they were made.

Decades ago, Damon G. Douglas began an extensive research project on the history of the New Jersey state coins. This important project was never completed, but Douglas’ unfinished manuscript was acquired by the American Numismatic Society where it has been one of the more frequently consulted items on early state coinages in the library collection. In the interest of making Douglas’ work more widely available, the American Numismatic Society publishes this valuable study for the first time. In addition, the manuscript has been annotated by prominent specialists on New Jersey coppers – David D. Gladfelter, Roger A. Moore, Md, FAAP, Gary A. Trudgen, Dennis P. Wierzba, Raymond J. Williams – in order to bring the work up to date.

Contents:

Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Matthias Ogden
Coinage Petitions to the Legislature
Walter Mould
Albion Cox Page
Thomas Goadsby
The Granting of the Copper Coinage Privilege
The Rahway Mint
Setting up the Mint
Operations at the Rahway Mint
Legal Disputes Affecting Mint Operations
The Morris-Town Mint
The Elizabeth-Town Coining
The “New York” Mint
Uncertain Mints
Numismatics of the Coinage
The Coinage
Discussion
Miscellaneous Notes
Index


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Numismatic Finds of the Americas

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(Numismatic Notes and Monographs 169, 2009)

by John M. Kleeberg

Hardcover
ISBN 978-0-89722-311-9
List price $125

An inventory, modeled on the Inventory of Greek Coin Hoards, enumerates approximately 900 coin finds, chiefly from the United States, but also from Canada and most other countries in the Americas. Also included are about 150 finds of American coins found outside the Americas. Each entry contains the find spot, date of finding, date of deposit, detailed description of the contents, and a bibliography. The inventory exploits the numismatic, shipwreck, and archaeological literatures, newspapers, and law reports of treasure trove cases more thoroughly than has ever been done before.

Contents:

Part I: Numismatic Finds in the Americas
Part II: Treasury Accumulation and Release of U.S. Silver Dollars
Part III: Finds of American Coins outside the Americas
References
Index of Find Spots
Index to Special Types of Finds and to Named Hoards
Index to Contents of Finds

The Silver Coins of Massachusetts

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by Christopher J. Salmon (2010)

Hardcover, full color
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-316-0
ISBN-10: 0-89722-316
Price: US$24.98 plus shipping and handling (no Member discount)

The silver coins of Massachusetts hold a special place in early American numismatics. They were the first coins struck in British North America, a mere generation after the establishment of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Because of their historical importance and charming style, they have prompted rich inquiry among scholars and an intense interest and desire among collectors.

The Silver Coins of Massachusetts is a splendidly illustrated review of these coins, employing the latest historical and numismatic evidence as well as novel scientific analysis. Minting technique is explored in detail. All varieties of the coinage are newly classified with a consistent yet flexible taxonomic system that lists the varieties in chronological order and can readily accommodate potential future discoveries. The system allows an appreciation for how varieties evolved and the relative degree of change that occurred at each step. It is designed to be as simple as possible without oversimplifying, with all varieties named according to their obverse and reverse dies. The book includes a fully illustrated atlas that details important characteristic features. The last part of the atlas displays each variety at actual size to aid in attribution.

Contents:

Part One: Classification
A Revised Taxonomy of the Massachusetts Silver Coinage with Concordance to Noe and Crosby
Advantages of the Original Crosby Classification
Intermediate Types with Interpolative Designations: Problems with the Noe Classification
Advantages of the New System: The Crosby Model
Subseries Numbered Separately
Chronology and Method of Attribution
New England and Willow Tree Series
Oak Tree Series
The Spiny Tree Coins and the Evidence of the Overstrikes
The Large Planchet Pine Tree Shillings
The Small Planchet Pine Tree Shillings
The Pine Tree Sixpence Varieties
Counterfeits and Questionable Varieties
Die Links of the Small Planchet Pine Tree Shillings
Concordance Tables
Part Two: Minting Technique
The Problem of the Willow Tree Coins
Comparison of Minting Techniques of the Massachusetts Silver Coinage: Hand Hammering and the Rocker Press
Rocker Press Phenomena
Acquired Damage from Flattening
The Inner Circle Index: A Measure of Distortion and Evidence of Rocker Press Manufacture
Inner Circle Indices for Willow, Oak and Pine Tree Shillings
Characteristics of the Willow Tree Coinage: Weak and Discordant Multiple Strikes
A Graphical Method of Determining Strike Multiplicity and Die Rotation and Translation Between Strikes
New Composite Reconstructions of the Willow Tree Shilling Dies
Apparent Die Axis of the Willow Tree Coinage
Multiple Strikes of Similar Energy: The Effects of Die Angulation
A Physical Explanation for the Weak Strikes of the Willow Tree Coinage
The Acquisition of a Coining Press
Fabric of the Willow Tree Coinage
Quality of Execution of the Willow Tree Coinage Dies: Mannerist Style
Conclusion
Part Three: Atlas
Bibliography

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The Feel of Steel: The Art and History of Bank-Note Engraving in the United States

tomaskocoverThe Feel of Steel: The Art and History of Bank-Note Engraving in the United States

by Mark D. Tomasko (2012)

Hardcover, 180 pp.
ISBN-13: 978 089722 321 8

OUT OF PRINT

The Feel of Steel provides an unusual look into the two-hundred-year history and the process of bank-note engraving in the United States, a beautiful art brought to its peak in America in the nineteenth century. Part I traces the history, with particular attention to the American Bank Note Company, the small bank-note firms founded after the Civil War, and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The decline of the industry in the late twentieth century closes the history.

Part II lays out the process of designing, engraving, and printing bank-note-engraved documents. Part II also contains an extended discussion of the artwork origins of the picture engraving, information found in few other places. Part III introduces the members of American Bank Note’s picture-engraving department at thirty-year intervals in the twentieth century, shown in group photographs and with an illustration of each man’s work.

This revised edition has 50% more illustrations than the original Bird and Bull fine press limited edition published in 2009. Besides the numerous illustrations (many in color), there are copious notes, a bibliography, and an extensive index, all adding to the volume’s research value. As no book on bank-note engraving would be complete without at least one sample of actual engraving, the frontispiece of the ANS edition of The Feel of Steel is the reprinted title and vignette from a nineteenth-century stock certificate. The reader can therefore actually experience the “feel of steel,” the tactile quality of intaglio printing.

Mark D. Tomasko is a collector, writer, and researcher on bank-note engraving, who has written more than thirty articles on the subject, in addition to giving many talks and mounting several museum exhibits.

Contents:

Part I: A Brief History of the Bank-Note-Engraving Industry in the United States
Origin of American Security Engraving: The State Bank Notes
Consolidation of the Bank Note Firms
Another Consolidation
New Companies Arise
American Bank Note’s Acquisitions Result in More New Companies
The Bureau Comes of Age
American Bank Note Company’s International Expansion
Other Small Firms and Continued Consolidation
The Beginning of the End
Part II: The Process: Engraving, Printing, Vignettes, Design, Training
Basic Printing Concepts
Cutting vs. Etching
Lathework
Transferring
Printing the Document
Tints
Letter Engraving
Vignettes and Portraits: The Heart of the Security Document
Signing Vignettes
Vignette Sources and Styles
Portraits
Nonfigurative Vignettes
Document Design
Types of Documents
Training Engravers
Late Twentieth-Century Changes
Part III: American Bank Note’s Picture-Engraving Department in the Twentieth Century
The American Bank Note Picture-Engraving Department, ca. 1910
The American Bank Note Picture-Engraving Department, 1941
The American Bank Note Picture-Engraving Department, 1970
Notes
Bibliography



From Crime to Punishment: Counterfeit and Debased Currencies in Colonial and Pre-Federal America

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(Numismatic Studies 27, 2012)

by Philip L. Mossman

Hardcover: 304 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-327-0
Price: $49.98 (no Member discount)
Limited number of signed copies: see below

Ever since coinage was developed in ancient Lydia, an element of society has sought to debase the coin of the realm for personal gain not only by counterfeiting, but also by shaving away precious metal. Currency debasement was not confined to the proletariat since throughout history various monarchs increased their royal revenues, or seigniorage, by reducing the quality of the coins’ specie content or its weight standard. The current text follows closely the course of royal English copper coinages whose high potential profit made them an ideal prey for counterfeiters. These forgeries flowed freely into the colonies where they overwhelmed, and eventually collapsed, the small change medium but not before various states sought to correct the evil of this imported copper trash.

Great attention is paid to Great Britain’s mercantilistic policies which shaped the character of the currency in the North American colonies where chronic hard money shortages encouraged counterfeit coinages of all stripes whose actual manufacture and circulation is examined in great detail. Colonists further sought to expand their monetary pool by printing bills of credit to meet the exigencies of the French and Indian Wars. This new paper currency likewise became the target for forgery and a battle royal ensued between the colonial treasurers and bands of counterfeiters as they competed to outsmart each other. But as “the weed of crime bears bitter fruit,” many counterfeiters were apprehended and punished for their evil deeds.

Contents:

Chapter One: The Landscape of Counterfeit Money
Chapter Two: Pre-1700 Counterfeiting
Chapter Three: Who’s Who in Counterfeiting
Chapter Four: “Counterfeiting 101”
Chapter Five: English Copper Coinages
Chapter Six: State Coppers to the Rescue
Chapter Seven: Genuine Paper Money
Chapter Eight: Altered Paper Money
Chapter Nine: Counterfeit Paper Money
Chapter Ten: Laws and Penalties

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American Art Medals, 1909–1995

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(Studies in Medallic Art 1, 2011)

by David T. Alexander

hardcover, illus.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-317-1
List price: $150 (plus S&H)
Member price: $105 (plus S&H)

American Art Medals, 1909–1995 is the first comprehensive study of the two most important series of art medals produced in the United States: the medals of the Circle of Friends of the Medallion (1909–1915) and those of the Society of Medalists (1930–1995). Together, these two series offer an unmatched panorama of American medallic sculpture in the twentieth century.

Founded by the art writer Charles de Kay and the collector Robert Hewitt, Jr., the Circle of Friends of the Medallion issued only twelve medals in its brief existence. Occurring, however, at a time when the Beaux-Arts movement had brought medallic art to a higher prominence among sculptors than it has enjoyed before or since, the series is of great significance for the development of the American art medal.

The Society of Medalists, during its life of sixty-six years, produced a much more extensive series: 128 regular issues (one of which includes six separate pieces), as well as four special issues designed for the Society (and one other special issue of an already existing medal). This body of work showcases the development of diverse artistic styles among figurative sculptors of the twentieth century, from classicism to modernism. The 123 sculptors whose work was presented in this series include almost every major American medalist of the era as well as several notable artists from other countries.

In addition to cataloguing the issues of these two medallic art organizations, this book features an innovative effort to record the different colors and patinas in which the medals were issued. Especially for the Society of Medalists, whose long history meant that different production batches of a particular medal might have been made several decades apart, this hitherto neglected dimension in the study of art medals shows how changes in the surface finish can yield truly startling variations in the visual impact of a design.

Contents:

The Circle of Friends of the Medallion, 1908–1915
The Medals of the Circle of Friends
The End of the Circle of Friends, 1915
The Society of Medalists, 1928–1995
The Regular Issues of the Society of Medalists
Epilogue: The Passing of the Society of Medalists
Anniversary and Special Issues of the Society of Medalists
Derivative Issues of the Society of Medalists
References