American Journal of Numismatics 7/8

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Paperback
Price: $40.00

Read/Download via HathiTrust (Open Access).

Contents:

  • Michael Ierardi. The Tetradrachms of Agathocles of Syracuse: A Preliminary Study
  • David Sellwood. The “Victory” Drachms of Phraates IV
  • Ed Dobbins. Countermarked Characene Tetradrachms of Attambelos IV
  • Richard G. McAlee. Vespasian’s Syrian Provincial Coinage
  • William E. Metcalf and William J. Fulco, S. J. Coins from the Excavations at Tell Nimrin
  • Y. T. Nercessian. Two Silver Coins of Gosdantin III of Cilician Armenia
  • Neziiii Aykut. Some Coins of Mas’ud I, Qilijarslan II, and the Maliks
  • John M. Kleeberg. Reconstructing the Beach-Grunthal Hoard of Counterfeit Halfpence: The Montclair, New Jersey (1922) Hoard
  • Paul T. Keyser. Greco-Roman Alchemy and Coins of Imitation Silver
  • Giles F. Carter. The Chronology of Augustan Asses and Quadrantes Determined from Chemical Compositions
  • Book Reviews

Copper Coinage of the State of New Jersey

trudgen jacket 8by Damon G. Douglas, edited by Gary A. Trudgen (2004)

Hardcover, 130 pp., 3 illus.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-289-1
ISBN-10: 0-89722-289-X
List Price: $45.00 (available through the ANS only)

Read/Download via HathiTrust (Open Access).

When the American Revolutionary War ended in 1783, there was no central mint to supply the newly independent states with coinage. In fact, nearly a decade passed before Congress formed the US Mint in 1792 and attempted to unify the growing nation’s coin types. In the meantime, some of the states produced their own coins, under what were often primitive and difficult circumstances. Mute witnesses to our nation’s beginnings, these coinages have not always received the proper study they deserve. A case in point are the copper coins minted by the State of New Jersey, some of the more interesting state coinages because of their design and the circumstances under which they were made.

Decades ago, Damon G. Douglas began an extensive research project on the history of the New Jersey state coins. This important project was never completed, but Douglas’ unfinished manuscript was acquired by the American Numismatic Society where it has been one of the more frequently consulted items on early state coinages in the library collection. In the interest of making Douglas’ work more widely available, the American Numismatic Society publishes this valuable study for the first time. In addition, the manuscript has been annotated by prominent specialists on New Jersey coppers – David D. Gladfelter, Roger A. Moore, Md, FAAP, Gary A. Trudgen, Dennis P. Wierzba, Raymond J. Williams – in order to bring the work up to date.

Contents:

Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Matthias Ogden
Coinage Petitions to the Legislature
Walter Mould
Albion Cox Page
Thomas Goadsby
The Granting of the Copper Coinage Privilege
The Rahway Mint
Setting up the Mint
Operations at the Rahway Mint
Legal Disputes Affecting Mint Operations
The Morris-Town Mint
The Elizabeth-Town Coining
The “New York” Mint
Uncertain Mints
Numismatics of the Coinage
The Coinage
Discussion
Miscellaneous Notes
Index


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New Jersey State Coppers

NJCoppers

New Jersey State Coppers

by Roger S. Siboni, John L. Howes, and A. Buell Ish

Hardcover: 592 pp.

ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-328-7

OUT OF PRINT

As William Sheldon eloquently put it in Penny Whimsy:

Old copper, like beauty, appears to possess a certain intrinsic quality or charm… [with] an almost living warmth and personality not encountered in any other metal…. You see rich shades of green, red, brown, yellow, and even deep ebony: together not elsewhere matched in nature save perhaps in autumn leaves….

Early coppers are rich in die varieties, cracked dies, imperfect and unusual planchets, mis-struck coins and other minor variations. It is therefore not surprising that to some extent the different die varieties are recognizable by characteristic color and surface texture, as well as by die breaks, peculiarities of the planchet, and so on.

New Jersey State Coppers shows that never were these words more true than in the case of the coins struck for New Jersey by Thomas Goadsby, Albion Cox, Walter Mould, and Matthias Ogden from 1786 until as late as 1790. By way of introduction, the authors fully discuss the often tumultuous history of the New Jersey copper coinage and its creators alongside the equally compelling story of the men, like Dr. Edward Maris, who first appreciated the “living warmth and personality” of the coins and formed the great collections of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Every known New Jersey die variety is presented in minute detail with lavish enlarged full-color illustrations, condition censuses, as well as commentary on die states and other notable features.

The authors also include such supplementary material as the original documents related to the eighteenth- century coining venture, imitations created for the collector market in the nineteenth century, as well as suggestions for developing a personal collection. New Jersey State Coppers will surely become the primary tool for the study of this coinage and the basis for deepening the understanding and appreciation of its charm as old copper.