Copper Coinage of the State of New Jersey

trudgen jacket 8by Damon G. Douglas, edited by Gary A. Trudgen (2004)

Hardcover, 130 pp., 3 illus.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-289-1
ISBN-10: 0-89722-289-X
List Price: $45.00 (available through the ANS only)

Read/Download via HathiTrust (Open Access).

When the American Revolutionary War ended in 1783, there was no central mint to supply the newly independent states with coinage. In fact, nearly a decade passed before Congress formed the US Mint in 1792 and attempted to unify the growing nation’s coin types. In the meantime, some of the states produced their own coins, under what were often primitive and difficult circumstances. Mute witnesses to our nation’s beginnings, these coinages have not always received the proper study they deserve. A case in point are the copper coins minted by the State of New Jersey, some of the more interesting state coinages because of their design and the circumstances under which they were made.

Decades ago, Damon G. Douglas began an extensive research project on the history of the New Jersey state coins. This important project was never completed, but Douglas’ unfinished manuscript was acquired by the American Numismatic Society where it has been one of the more frequently consulted items on early state coinages in the library collection. In the interest of making Douglas’ work more widely available, the American Numismatic Society publishes this valuable study for the first time. In addition, the manuscript has been annotated by prominent specialists on New Jersey coppers – David D. Gladfelter, Roger A. Moore, Md, FAAP, Gary A. Trudgen, Dennis P. Wierzba, Raymond J. Williams – in order to bring the work up to date.

Contents:

Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Matthias Ogden
Coinage Petitions to the Legislature
Walter Mould
Albion Cox Page
Thomas Goadsby
The Granting of the Copper Coinage Privilege
The Rahway Mint
Setting up the Mint
Operations at the Rahway Mint
Legal Disputes Affecting Mint Operations
The Morris-Town Mint
The Elizabeth-Town Coining
The “New York” Mint
Uncertain Mints
Numismatics of the Coinage
The Coinage
Discussion
Miscellaneous Notes
Index


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Cobs, Pieces of Eight and Treasure Coins: The Early Spanish-American Mints and their Coinages 1536–1773

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by Sewall Menzel (2004)

Hardcover, 484 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-284-6
ISBN-10: 0-89722-284-9
List Price: US$125.00

In the 1520s the Spanish crown began to realise through expanded explorations of the likes of Hernando Cortez and Francisco Pizarro that it was in charge of an enormous empire requiring extensive settlement and systems of control. Royal mints were founded to control, evaluate and tax gold and silver coming from the mines, as well as to produce the coins needed for everyday commercial transactions. For some 250 years the mints churned out millions of cob-style coins, many of which found their way into the treasure galleons of the day. Soon mints such as Mexico and Potosi became known as the financial ‘pillars of empire’ and enabled Spain to engage in seemingly endless wars of conquest and plunder. Geography, crown intransigence, bureaucratic incompetence, royal intrigues and outright scandal all had an impact on the mints and their productions. In this comprehensive and fully referenced study, Sewall Menzel brings out the critical detail and information needed to understand the ten early Spanish mints of Mexico, Santo Domingo, Peru, Potosi, Panama, Santa Fe de Nuevo Reino (Bogota), Cartagena, Cuzco, Guatemala and Cuba and their respective coinages. Through the use of some two thousand photos and diagrams the coins are identified by mint, king, denomination, mint assayer and type.

Contents:

Kings, Coin Designs, Anomalies and Special Issues
The Mexico Mint (1536–1734)
The Santo Domingo Mint (1542–1634)
The Lima Mint (1568–1588, 1659–1660, 1684–1752)
The Potosí Mint (1573–1773)
The Panama Mint (1580–1583)
The Santa Fe de Bogotá Mint (1622–1756)
The Cartagena Mint (1622–1635, 1655)
The Cuzco Mint (1698)
The Guatemala Mint (1733–1754)
The Cuba Mint (1741)
Bibliography

The Silver Coins of Massachusetts

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by Christopher J. Salmon (2010)

Hardcover, full color
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-316-0
ISBN-10: 0-89722-316
Price: US$24.98 plus shipping and handling (no Member discount)

The silver coins of Massachusetts hold a special place in early American numismatics. They were the first coins struck in British North America, a mere generation after the establishment of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Because of their historical importance and charming style, they have prompted rich inquiry among scholars and an intense interest and desire among collectors.

The Silver Coins of Massachusetts is a splendidly illustrated review of these coins, employing the latest historical and numismatic evidence as well as novel scientific analysis. Minting technique is explored in detail. All varieties of the coinage are newly classified with a consistent yet flexible taxonomic system that lists the varieties in chronological order and can readily accommodate potential future discoveries. The system allows an appreciation for how varieties evolved and the relative degree of change that occurred at each step. It is designed to be as simple as possible without oversimplifying, with all varieties named according to their obverse and reverse dies. The book includes a fully illustrated atlas that details important characteristic features. The last part of the atlas displays each variety at actual size to aid in attribution.

Contents:

Part One: Classification
A Revised Taxonomy of the Massachusetts Silver Coinage with Concordance to Noe and Crosby
Advantages of the Original Crosby Classification
Intermediate Types with Interpolative Designations: Problems with the Noe Classification
Advantages of the New System: The Crosby Model
Subseries Numbered Separately
Chronology and Method of Attribution
New England and Willow Tree Series
Oak Tree Series
The Spiny Tree Coins and the Evidence of the Overstrikes
The Large Planchet Pine Tree Shillings
The Small Planchet Pine Tree Shillings
The Pine Tree Sixpence Varieties
Counterfeits and Questionable Varieties
Die Links of the Small Planchet Pine Tree Shillings
Concordance Tables
Part Two: Minting Technique
The Problem of the Willow Tree Coins
Comparison of Minting Techniques of the Massachusetts Silver Coinage: Hand Hammering and the Rocker Press
Rocker Press Phenomena
Acquired Damage from Flattening
The Inner Circle Index: A Measure of Distortion and Evidence of Rocker Press Manufacture
Inner Circle Indices for Willow, Oak and Pine Tree Shillings
Characteristics of the Willow Tree Coinage: Weak and Discordant Multiple Strikes
A Graphical Method of Determining Strike Multiplicity and Die Rotation and Translation Between Strikes
New Composite Reconstructions of the Willow Tree Shilling Dies
Apparent Die Axis of the Willow Tree Coinage
Multiple Strikes of Similar Energy: The Effects of Die Angulation
A Physical Explanation for the Weak Strikes of the Willow Tree Coinage
The Acquisition of a Coining Press
Fabric of the Willow Tree Coinage
Quality of Execution of the Willow Tree Coinage Dies: Mannerist Style
Conclusion
Part Three: Atlas
Bibliography

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Zecca: The Mint of Venice in the Middle Ages

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by Alan M. Stahl

(Published in association with the Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000)

Hardcover, 497 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-8018-6383-7
ISBN-10: 0-8018-6383-X

Price: $79.00
Member Price: $63.00

This volume is the first detailed study of the workings of a premodern mint based on both original archival research and detailed study of the coins themselves.

Contents:

Part I: The Venetian Mint and Coinage to 1423
The Age of the Penny, 800–1200
The Age of the Grosso, c. 1200–1285
The Age of the Ducat, 1285–1330
The Age of the Soldino, 1330–1379
The Age of Crisis and Reform, 1379–1423
Part II: The Zecca in the Life of Medieval Venice
The Setting of Mint Policy
Government Control of the Bullion Market
The Economics of the Zecca
The Circulation of Venetian Coinages
Cullers, Clippers, and Counterfeiters
Part III: Within the Mint
The Mintmasters
The Mint Building and Staff
Coin Design and Die Engraving
From Bullion to Coin
The Standards of Medieval Venetian Glass
The Volume of Production at the Venetian Zecca
Appendix: Offices Relating to Bullion and the Zecca
Appendix: Finds of Medieval Venetian Coins
Bibliography