Concordia Disciplinarum

Essays on Ancient Coinage, History, and Archaeology
in Honor of William E. Metcalf
Concordia-Cover

(Numismatic Studies 38)

Edited by Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans

List price: $75 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $52.50 plus shipping & handling

ISSN 051-7404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-357-7
Hardcover, 283 pages, b/w images, color frontispiece

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CONTENTS

Editors’ Preface, by Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans

Bibliography of William E. Metcalf

List of Abbreviations

Scythian-Greek Relations in the North and Northwestern Black Sea Area (6th–5th centuries BC): Numismatic Evidence, by Elena Stolyarik

The Process of Monetization from Athens to Egypt: Evidence and Models, by Andrew Hogan

The Thrace (?) ca. 1955 Hoard (IGCH 738), by Peter van Alfen

Numismatic Evidence for Compound Numbers Written in Greek Alphabetic Numerals, by Paul Keyser

The Asia Minor 1949 Hoard (IGCH 1450) at the American Numismatic Society, by Constantin A. Marinescu

Seeing Caesar’s Symbols: Religious Implements on the Coins of Julius Caesar and his Successors, by Roberta Stewart

A New Revival of an Old Coin Type: Sardis in the Augustan Era, by Jane DeRose Evans

Earthquakes in Asia Minor, the cura provinciae of Tiberius and the Cities, by Bernhard Weisser

A Neronian Overstrike at the Harvard Art Museums, by Carmen Arnold-Biucchi and Rebecca A. Katz

The Flavian Colosseum Sestertii and Imperial Praise, by Nathan T. Elkins

The Forum of Domitian on his Coins, by Ben Lee Damsky

Roma at Corinth: The Coins and the Monument, by Mary Hoskins Walbank

Le monnayage émis à Silandos de Lydie sous Septime Sévère, by Michel Amandry

The Coinage of Septimius Severus and the Battle of Lugdunum, by Gary Reger

Imperial Representation and Distributional Politics under Severus Alexander, by Carlos F. Noreña

Quantifying the Size of a Coinage: Die Studies or Coin Finds, by Roger Bland

An Aureus of Allectus with a Remarkable Pedigree, by Andrew Burnett

Interaction with Coins in the Liberalitas Relief on the Arch of Constantine, by Martin Beckmann

A Double-Obverse Bronze of the Constantinian Period from the Antioch Excavations, by Alan M. Stahl and Rafail Zoulis

The Ascension of Julian: Ammianus Marcellinus 20.4, by Sarah E. Cox

Index

FROM THE PREFACE

William E. Metcalf is a prominent name in numismatics, but is also universally recognized among those who study Roman history and archaeology. Known especially for his many contributions to Roman and Byzantine coinage, it is difficult to find a book or article that does not cite his work. A generous scholar, one can see his name in the acknowledgements in works by numismatists and scholars in adjacent disciplines who incorporate numismatic evidence. It is thus appropriate— and overdue—that his former students and colleagues present this Festschrift in recognition of Metcalf ’s impact on our discipline. It would be impossible to incorporate contributions from all of his colleagues and friends; the contributors herein represent but a fraction of those who would honor him.

His articles and reviews number in the hundreds, and he is author and editor of several books. Some of his best-known research centers on the cistophori. In 1980, he published his doctoral dissertation as his first monograph: The Cistophori of Hadrian (New York: American Numismatic Society, Numismatic Studies 15). Continuing this work is his recent The Later Republican Cistophori (New York: American Numismatic Society, Numismatic Notes and Monographs 170, 2017). A mark of his place in the entire field of numismatics is his editorship of The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012). Although retired from teaching and curating, he continues his research, and is currently completing Roman Provincial Coinage X (Valerian to Diocletian).

Bill, as he is called by friends and colleagues, received his degrees from the University of Michigan. He was awarded his A.B. in Latin, with distinction and highest honors, in 1969, his A.M. in Classical Studies in 1970, and his Ph.D. in Classical Studies in 1973. That same year, he came to New York to begin his long association with the American Numismatic Society, where he would work until 2000. From 1973 to 1975, he served as Assistant Curator of Roman and Byzantine Coins; in 1975, he was promoted to Associate Curator, and in 1978, to Deputy Chief Curator. He succeeded Margaret Thompson as Chief Curator in 1979, and remained in this position until his departure in 2000. Presently, he is Honorary Curator and Life Fellow at the ANS. While serving at the ANS, Bill was appointed Visiting Professor or Adjunct Professor at several institutions, including Columbia University, Princeton University, Università degli Studi di Padova, Bryn Mawr College, Rutgers University, and New York University. In 2002, he was hired as the Curator of Coins and Medals at the Yale University Art Gallery and as Professor of Classics (adj.) at Yale University. In 2007, with the endowment of his curatorial position, he was named Ben Lee Damsky Curator of Coins and Medals, a title that he held until his retirement from Yale in 2014. Prof. Metcalf holds many distinguished honors and awards that recognize his research. Some key highlights are his membership at the Institute for Advanced Study in 1988–1989, his election as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1998, and his receipt of the Jeton de Vermeil of the Société Française de Numismatique in 2008. He is also the honorand of the annual William E. Metcalf Lecture Series of the Archaeological Institute of America, established in 2000 by Anna Maguerite McCann.

Among the people who influenced Bill’s professional development, two stand out. The first is Theodore “Ted” V. Buttrey (1929–2018), his mentor and advisor for his Ph.D. It was Ted who introduced him to the discipline of numismatics, involving him in the publication of the coins from the University of Michigan’s excavations at Carthage. These initial studies led to Bill’s interest and expertise in Roman Provincial coins (see also Metcalf 1977, 1979a, 1982b, 1987a, 1989, 2000, 2002a, 2007, 2008a, 2014, 2017) and the publication of hoards and excavation coins (Metcalf 1974a, 1974b 1975a, 1975b, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979b, 1979c, 1980, 1981a, 1981b, 1982a, 1987b, 1988, 19912, 1994, 1995/6, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002b). Ted’s ability to question received knowledge is clearly reflected in Bill’s careful arguments and fresh insights.

At the American Numismatic Society, he met his supervisor, mentor, and friend, the redoubtable Margaret Thompson (1911–1992). She exemplified for him unstinting work on behalf of the American Numismatic Society, the conduct of scholarly discourse, and the interest in bodies of material beyond the cataloging of particular coin types.

Teaching the next generation of numismatic scholars has been part of Bill’s life, as the two editors of this volume can attest. He has promoted the work of numismatics by introducing younger scholars to established scholars and collectors, and to dig directors who need numismatists for their excavations. His careful reading of forthcoming manuscripts has saved many an error or half-baked idea from going to readers or editors. His service to the field is reflected in his reviews of manuscripts and books, and service on the editorial boards for Lexicon Mythologiae Classicae, American Journal of Archaeology, Journal of Roman Archaeology, American Journal of Numismatics, Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, and Bryn Mawr Classical Review, and on various committees for the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) and the Archaeological Institute of America.

We offer this book in gratitude, as a reflection of Bill’s interests and deep scholarship, and an homage to his friendship and teaching.

Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans, May 2018

 

The Later Republican Cistophori

Cistophori(Numismatic Notes and Monographs 170)

by William Metcalf

List price: $75 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $52.50 plus shipping & handling ISSN 0078-2718
ISBN 978-0-89722-347-8 Hardcover, 184 pages, incl. 86 b/w plates

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The Later Republican Cistophori treats the cistophoric coinage bearing the names of Roman magistrates, most commonly proconsuls, struck in 58–48 BC, as well as other issues which depart from the traditional paradigm.

The cistophori were originally introduced as the currency of the Hellenistic Attalid kingdom by the mid-second century BC. They were retained as the coins of the realm even after the kingdom was bequeathed to Rome in 133 BC and continued to be struck down into the first century BC.

The Later Republican Cistophori catalogues and illustrates some 523 cistophori and fractions from the mints of Ephesus, Pergamum, Tralles, and Apameia, as well as the ATPA series and related issues. A detailed commentary discusses the Roman magistrates and the Greek signers of their coinages as well as well as the metrology and fineness of the cistophori.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

William E. Metcalf received his PhD from the University of Michigan (1973) and almost immediately joined the staff of the American Numismatic Society. He remained there for 27 years as curator of Roman and Byzantine coins, and from 1979–2000 as Chief Curator. In 2002 he joined Yale University as Professor Adjunct of Classics and Curator (later Ben Lee Damsky Curator) of Coins and Medals, and retired in 2014. In addition to Yale he has taught at Columbia, Princeton, New York, and Rutgers Universities, Bryn Mawr College, and the Università degli Studi, Padova. He has lectured widely and is the author or editor of nine books and over 100 articles and reviews.

 

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