Kushan, Kushano-Sasanian, and Kidarite Coins

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by David Jongeward and Joe Cribb with Peter Donovan (2015)

List price: US$150
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-334-8 Hardback, 1 vol, 322 pp., color and b/w figs., 79 color pls.

The Kushan Empire was a vast inland empire that stretched across Central and South Asia during the first to fourth centuries AD. The origins of Kushan dynasty continue to be debated, and precise dates, especially for the late Kushan kings, remain elusive, but the coinage reveals the Kushan dynasty as a major force in the cultural and political history of the ancient Silk Road.

Kushan coinage began c. AD 50 with issues of the first Kushan king, Kujula Kadphises (c. AD 50–90). The first Kushan coins were based on Greek, Scythian, and Parthian coin designs already current in the territory of present day Afghanistan and Pakistan. Under Kujula Kadphises’ son Wima Takto (c. AD 91–113) and grandson Wima Kadphises (c. AD 113–127) the coinage system was gradually centralized to serve the entire Kushan empire, stretching from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan to northern India. Gold and copper denominations were established during the reign of Wima Kadphises which were maintained through the reigns of ten more kings until the demise of the Kushan empire in the mid-fourth century AD.

This catalogue presents all the Kushan coins in the American Numismatic Society, with selected illustrations, detailed descriptions and commentary. The production system of Kushan coinage is presented with major revisions of chronology and organization compared with previous publications. This presentation has been based on the latest coin-based research, including die studies and site find analysis. The coins are classified by ruler, metal, mint, production phase, denomination, type and variety. Introductory essays present the historical and cultural contexts of the kings and their coins. All the ANS gold coins and a selection of copper coins are illustrated. This catalogue also features two series of coins issued by the Kushano-Sasanian and the Kidarite Hun rulers of former Kushan territory because they followed and adapted the Kushan coinage system.

The authors intend this catalogue to be a tool for scholars and collectors alike for understanding, identifying, and attributing these fascinating coins that represent four centuries of Central and South Asian ancient history.

Contents:

The Kushan Empire and its Coinage
Kushan Coinage Tradition
Kushan Monetary System and Mints
Previous Studies of Kushan Coins
Kushan, Kushano-Sasanian, and Kidarite Coins in the Collection of the American Numismatic Society
Kushan, Kushano-Sasanian, and Kidarite Coin Types by Ruler
1. Da Yuezhi Coins and the Coinage of Kujula Kadphises (Coins 1–146)
2. The Coinage of Wima Takto (Coins 147–257)
3. The Coinage of Wima Kadphises (Coins 258–369)
4. The Coinage of Kanishka I (Coins 370–708)
5. The Coinage of Huvishka (Coins 709–1081)
6. The Coinage of Vasudeva I (Coins 1082–1200)
7. The Coinage of the Late Kushans (Coins 1201–1688)
Kanishka II
Vasishka
Kanishka III
Vasudeva II
Mahi
Shaka
Kipunadha
8. The Coinage of the Kushano-Sasanians, Part One: Vasudeva Imitations (Coins 1690–2139)
9. The Coinage of the Kushano-Sasanians, Part Two: Royal Issues (Coins 2140–2408)
Unidentified King
Ardashir
Peroz I
Hormizd I
Hormizd II
Peroz II
Varahran
Shapur II
10. The Coinage of the Kidarite Huns (Coins 2409-2444)
11. Unidentifiable Coins (probably Kushan) from the Lincoln Series (Coins 2445–2470)
Appendices
A. North and East India Imitations (Coins A1–A168)
B. Huvishka Portrait Types
C. Deities on Kushan Coins
D. Kushan Tamgas
Addendum: The Story of a Fake Kushan Coin, ANS 1944.100.48106
Concordance to Göbl
Bibliography

American Journal of Numismatics 10

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Hardcover, 157 pp., 12 pls.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-275-4
ISBN-10: 0-89722-275-X
Price: $40.00

Read/Download via HathiTrust (Open Access).

Contents:

Paolo Visona. Carthaginian Coinage in Perspective
James A. Schell. Iconography of the Control Marks on the Alexander Issues of Soli, Cyprus
Charles IIersh. The Phoenicia 1997 Hoard of Alexander-Type Tetradrachms
Charles Hersh. Tyrus Rediviva Reconsidered
Elena Stolyarik. The Reign and Chronology of the Archon Hygiaenon
Oliver Hoover. Notes on Some Imitation Drachms of Demetrius I Soter from Commagene
Getzel M. Cohen. The Letters ΙΑΑΓ on Some Coins of Abila and Gadara
Jay M. Galst. A New Variety of a Roman Provincial Tetradrachm from Neapolis
Mary Marciaret Fulghum and Florent Heintz. A Hoard of Early Byzantine Glass Weights from Sardis
Gerald M. Browne. Three Notes on Gupta Coin Legends
Warren C. Schultz. Mahmud ibn ‘Ali and the “New Fulus”: Late Fourteenth Century Mamluk Egyptian Copper Coinage Reconsidered
Book Reviews

Coinage of the American Confederation Period

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(Coinage of the Americas Conference Proceedings 11, 1996)

edited by Philip L. Mossman

Hardcover, 346 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-263-1
ISBN-10: 0-89722-263-6
Price: US$25.00 (no Member discount)

This volume contains papers drawn from the Coinage of the Americas Conference (COAC) held in 1995.

Contents:

The American Confederation: The Times and Its Money (Philip L. Mossman)

The English George III Contemporary Counterfeit Halfpenny: A Statistical Study of Production and Distribution (Charles W. Smith)

The Shipwreck of the Faithful Steward: A “Missing Link” in the Export of British and Irish Halfpence (John M. Kleeberg)

New Thoughts on the Nova Constellatio Private Copper Coinage (Eric P. Newman)

Vermont Coppers: Coinage of an Independent Republic (Pete Smith)

The So-Called Atlee Broken “A” Letter Punch (John Lorenzo)

Coinage During the Confederation: Two Near Misses for Matthew Boulton (Richard G. Doty)

Coinage Featuring George Washington (George Fuld)

Medals of the Comitia Americana Series in the Collections of the American Numismatic Society and Other Public Institutions (Alan M. Stahl)

The Coinage of The Americas Conference is an annual meeting that provides a forum for exchange of knowledge on a selected theme in the numismatics of the western hemisphere.

Circulating Counterfeits of the Americas

(Coinage of the Americas Conference Proceedings 14, 2000)

edited by John M. Kleeberg

Hardcover, 227 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-279-2
ISBN-10: 0-89722-279-2

Regular Price: US$35.00
Member Price: US$24.50

(Only available for purchase through the ANS.)

This volume is a record of the Coinage of the Americas Conference (COAC) held in 1998.

Contents:

Imported and Domestic Counterfeit Copper Coins in Pre-Federal America (Philip L. Mossman and Charles W. Smith)

Counterfeiting of the Bolivian Four Soles Coins of 1830 (Horace Flatt)

NLG, Circulating Counterfeit Capped Bust Half Dollars, 1807–1839 (Keith Davignon and Bradley S. Karoleff)

Counterfeit 2 Reales of the Bust Type: Charles III, Charles IV, Ferdinand VII, 1771–1821 A Survey and Die Study (John M. Kleeberg)

The Counterfeit Spanish Two Reales: Canadian Blacksmiths or North American Tokens (John P. Lorenzo)

Adding Insult to Injury: Altered Notes of the Southern Bank of Georgia (Richard G. Doty)

Nineteenth-Century Counterfeit Detection Devices (Emmett McDonald)

Appendix 1: A Counterfeit’s Arrest Proves the Circulation of Massachusetts Silver Shillings as Late as 1784 (Eric P. Newman)

Appendix 2: Flowing Hair and Draped Bust Counterfeit Half Dollars in the ANS Collection (John M. Kleeberg)

The Coinage of the Americas Conference is an annual meeting that provides a forum for exchange of knowledge on a selected theme in the numismatics of the western hemisphere.


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Copper Coinage of the State of New Jersey

trudgen jacket 8by Damon G. Douglas, edited by Gary A. Trudgen (2004)

Hardcover, 130 pp., 3 illus.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-289-1
ISBN-10: 0-89722-289-X
List Price: $45.00 (available through the ANS only)

Read/Download via HathiTrust (Open Access).

When the American Revolutionary War ended in 1783, there was no central mint to supply the newly independent states with coinage. In fact, nearly a decade passed before Congress formed the US Mint in 1792 and attempted to unify the growing nation’s coin types. In the meantime, some of the states produced their own coins, under what were often primitive and difficult circumstances. Mute witnesses to our nation’s beginnings, these coinages have not always received the proper study they deserve. A case in point are the copper coins minted by the State of New Jersey, some of the more interesting state coinages because of their design and the circumstances under which they were made.

Decades ago, Damon G. Douglas began an extensive research project on the history of the New Jersey state coins. This important project was never completed, but Douglas’ unfinished manuscript was acquired by the American Numismatic Society where it has been one of the more frequently consulted items on early state coinages in the library collection. In the interest of making Douglas’ work more widely available, the American Numismatic Society publishes this valuable study for the first time. In addition, the manuscript has been annotated by prominent specialists on New Jersey coppers – David D. Gladfelter, Roger A. Moore, Md, FAAP, Gary A. Trudgen, Dennis P. Wierzba, Raymond J. Williams – in order to bring the work up to date.

Contents:

Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Matthias Ogden
Coinage Petitions to the Legislature
Walter Mould
Albion Cox Page
Thomas Goadsby
The Granting of the Copper Coinage Privilege
The Rahway Mint
Setting up the Mint
Operations at the Rahway Mint
Legal Disputes Affecting Mint Operations
The Morris-Town Mint
The Elizabeth-Town Coining
The “New York” Mint
Uncertain Mints
Numismatics of the Coinage
The Coinage
Discussion
Miscellaneous Notes
Index


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From Crime to Punishment: Counterfeit and Debased Currencies in Colonial and Pre-Federal America

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(Numismatic Studies 27, 2012)

by Philip L. Mossman

Hardcover: 304 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-327-0
Price: $49.98 (no Member discount)
Limited number of signed copies: see below

Ever since coinage was developed in ancient Lydia, an element of society has sought to debase the coin of the realm for personal gain not only by counterfeiting, but also by shaving away precious metal. Currency debasement was not confined to the proletariat since throughout history various monarchs increased their royal revenues, or seigniorage, by reducing the quality of the coins’ specie content or its weight standard. The current text follows closely the course of royal English copper coinages whose high potential profit made them an ideal prey for counterfeiters. These forgeries flowed freely into the colonies where they overwhelmed, and eventually collapsed, the small change medium but not before various states sought to correct the evil of this imported copper trash.

Great attention is paid to Great Britain’s mercantilistic policies which shaped the character of the currency in the North American colonies where chronic hard money shortages encouraged counterfeit coinages of all stripes whose actual manufacture and circulation is examined in great detail. Colonists further sought to expand their monetary pool by printing bills of credit to meet the exigencies of the French and Indian Wars. This new paper currency likewise became the target for forgery and a battle royal ensued between the colonial treasurers and bands of counterfeiters as they competed to outsmart each other. But as “the weed of crime bears bitter fruit,” many counterfeiters were apprehended and punished for their evil deeds.

Contents:

Chapter One: The Landscape of Counterfeit Money
Chapter Two: Pre-1700 Counterfeiting
Chapter Three: Who’s Who in Counterfeiting
Chapter Four: “Counterfeiting 101”
Chapter Five: English Copper Coinages
Chapter Six: State Coppers to the Rescue
Chapter Seven: Genuine Paper Money
Chapter Eight: Altered Paper Money
Chapter Nine: Counterfeit Paper Money
Chapter Ten: Laws and Penalties

Download order form here.

New Jersey State Coppers

NJCoppers

New Jersey State Coppers

by Roger S. Siboni, John L. Howes, and A. Buell Ish

Hardcover: 592 pp.

ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-328-7
List price: $235 (plus S&H)
Member price: $165 (plus S&H)

As William Sheldon eloquently put it in Penny Whimsy:

Old copper, like beauty, appears to possess a certain intrinsic quality or charm… [with] an almost living warmth and personality not encountered in any other metal…. You see rich shades of green, red, brown, yellow, and even deep ebony: together not elsewhere matched in nature save perhaps in autumn leaves….

Early coppers are rich in die varieties, cracked dies, imperfect and unusual planchets, mis-struck coins and other minor variations. It is therefore not surprising that to some extent the different die varieties are recognizable by characteristic color and surface texture, as well as by die breaks, peculiarities of the planchet, and so on.

New Jersey State Coppers shows that never were these words more true than in the case of the coins struck for New Jersey by Thomas Goadsby, Albion Cox, Walter Mould, and Matthias Ogden from 1786 until as late as 1790. By way of introduction, the authors fully discuss the often tumultuous history of the New Jersey copper coinage and its creators alongside the equally compelling story of the men, like Dr. Edward Maris, who first appreciated the “living warmth and personality” of the coins and formed the great collections of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Every known New Jersey die variety is presented in minute detail with lavish enlarged full-color illustrations, condition censuses, as well as commentary on die states and other notable features.

The authors also include such supplementary material as the original documents related to the eighteenth- century coining venture, imitations created for the collector market in the nineteenth century, as well as suggestions for developing a personal collection. New Jersey State Coppers will surely become the primary tool for the study of this coinage and the basis for deepening the understanding and appreciation of its charm as old copper.

Download order from here.