Medallic Art of the American Numismatic Society, 1865–2014

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(Studies in Medallic Art 2, 2015)

by Scott H. Miller

ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-335-5

1 vol, 181 pp, color and b/w figs
List price: $100 (plus S&H)
Member price: $70 (plus S&H)

During the past 150 years, the American Numismatic Society has been a leader in the publication of art medals in the United States. Generally employing the finest medalists available, the Society has set an example few can match. In addition, with the exception of the United States Mint, no U.S. entity can boast so long and distinguished a contribution in this area. Founded in 1858, the American Numismatic and Archaeological Society, as it was known from 1864–1907, believed the issuance of medals to be a part of its mission from the earliest years of its existence.

Author Scott H. Miller includes 60 medals issued by the ANS between 1865 and 2014 along with two COAC medals and the 1910 Actors’ Fund Medal, all accompanied by color photographs. Many entries are supplemented by artist’s sketches and archival photographs as well as the stories behind each issue. Four appendixes include recipients of some of these medals as well as the list of dies, hubs, galvanos, and casts of ANS medals in the ANS’s own collection.

Read the 2015 E-Sylum review by David Alexander.

Contents:

Part I — American Numismatic Society Medals
1. Lincoln Memorial Medal (1866)
2. Lincoln Memorial Medal, Second Dies (1867)
3. First Membership Medal, Rejected Reverse Die (1876)
4. First Membership Medal (1876)
5. Cleopatra’s Needle Medal (1881)
6. George Washington (Evacuation Day) Medal (1883)
7. Charles Edward Anthon Medal (1884)
8. Daniel Parish Medal (1890)
9. Columbus Quatercentenary Medal (1893)
10. William Augustus Muhlenberg Medal (1896)
11. Grant Monument Medal (1897)
12. National Conference of Charities and Correction Medal (1898)
13. Greater New York (Charter Day) Medal (1898)
14. Prince Henry Of Prussia Medal (1902)
15. Amerigo Vespucci Medal (1903)
16. John Paul Jones Medal (1906)
17. Sir Francis Drake Medal (1907)
18. Archer Milton Huntington Medal (1908)
19. Fiftieth Anniversary Medal (1908)
20. Algernon Sydney Sullivan Medal (1908)
21. Centennial of the Catholic Diocese of New York Medal (1908)
22. Grover Cleveland Memorial Medal (1908)
23. Hudson-Fulton Medal (1909)
24. Abraham Lincoln Centennial Medal (1909)
25. New Theatre of New York Medal (1909)
26. Second Membership Medal, Error Reverse (1910)
27. Second Membership Medal (1910)
28. International Medallic Exhibition Medal (1910)
29. Ernest Babelon Medal (1910)
30. J. Pierpont Morgan Memorial Medal (1913)
31. Declaration of War Medal, Uniface (1917)
32. Declaration of War Medal, Two-Sided (1917)
33. St. Bartholomew’s Church Medal (1917)
34. French and British War Commissions Medal (1917)
35. Catskill Aqueduct Medal (1917)
36. Independence Day Medal (1918)
37. King and Queen of the Belgians Medal (1918)
38. J. Sanford Saltus Award Medal (1919)
39. Joan of Arc Medal (1919)
40. Treaty of Versailles Medal (1919)
41. Prince of Wales Medal (1919)
42. American Red Cross War Council Medal (1921)
43. Marshal Foch Medal (1921)
44. Joseph Hodges Choate Medal (1922)
45. Paul Revere Medal (1925)
46. Manhattan Tercentenary Medal (1926)
47. Washington Sesquicentennial Medal (1939)
48. ANS Centennial Medal (1958)
49. Louis C. West Medal (1960)
50. Sydney P. Noe Medal (1965)
51. New York State Bicentennial Medal (1976)
52. New York City Bicentennial Medal (1976)
53. Third Membership Medal (1978)
54. ANS 125th Anniversary Medal (1983)
55. Statue of Liberty Centennial Medal (1986)
56. ANS Endowment Medal (1988)
57. Columbus Quincentenary Medal (1992)
58. Donald Partrick / New Building Medal (2004)
59. Q. David Bowers Medal (2010)
60. Eric P. Newman 100th Birthday Medal (2012)
Part II — COAC 1997
62. COAC Medal I (1997)
63. COAC Medal II (1997)
Part III — Medals Not Issued by the American Numismatic Society
64. Actors’ Fund Medal (1910)
Appendix 1: Address by Henry Russell Drowne
Appendix 2: List of Huntington Medal Recipients
Appendix 3: List of Saltus Award Recipients
Appendix 4: List of Dies, Hubs, Galvanos, and Casts of ANS Medals in the Collection of the American Numismatic Society
References

American Art Medals, 1909–1995

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(Studies in Medallic Art 1, 2011)

by David T. Alexander

hardcover, illus.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-317-1
List price: $150 (plus S&H)
Member price: $105 (plus S&H)

American Art Medals, 1909–1995 is the first comprehensive study of the two most important series of art medals produced in the United States: the medals of the Circle of Friends of the Medallion (1909–1915) and those of the Society of Medalists (1930–1995). Together, these two series offer an unmatched panorama of American medallic sculpture in the twentieth century.

Founded by the art writer Charles de Kay and the collector Robert Hewitt, Jr., the Circle of Friends of the Medallion issued only twelve medals in its brief existence. Occurring, however, at a time when the Beaux-Arts movement had brought medallic art to a higher prominence among sculptors than it has enjoyed before or since, the series is of great significance for the development of the American art medal.

The Society of Medalists, during its life of sixty-six years, produced a much more extensive series: 128 regular issues (one of which includes six separate pieces), as well as four special issues designed for the Society (and one other special issue of an already existing medal). This body of work showcases the development of diverse artistic styles among figurative sculptors of the twentieth century, from classicism to modernism. The 123 sculptors whose work was presented in this series include almost every major American medalist of the era as well as several notable artists from other countries.

In addition to cataloguing the issues of these two medallic art organizations, this book features an innovative effort to record the different colors and patinas in which the medals were issued. Especially for the Society of Medalists, whose long history meant that different production batches of a particular medal might have been made several decades apart, this hitherto neglected dimension in the study of art medals shows how changes in the surface finish can yield truly startling variations in the visual impact of a design.

Contents:

The Circle of Friends of the Medallion, 1908–1915
The Medals of the Circle of Friends
The End of the Circle of Friends, 1915
The Society of Medalists, 1928–1995
The Regular Issues of the Society of Medalists
Epilogue: The Passing of the Society of Medalists
Anniversary and Special Issues of the Society of Medalists
Derivative Issues of the Society of Medalists
References