Money and Power in Hellenistic Bactria

(Numismatic Studies 40)

by Simon Glenn

List price: $150 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $105 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404X
ISBN 978-0-89722-361-4
Hardcover, xv + 386 text pages, b/w figs., b/w plates

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The coins produced by the kings of the Graeco-Bactrian kingdom of the third and second centuries BC are the best and, in some cases only, primary source of evidence for the history of the period. The lack of context has, however, often led to highly speculative uses of the numismatic evidence in previous historical reconstructions. Money and Power in Hellenistic Bactria returns the focus to the coins themselves and presents the results of a full die study of the issues of Euthydemus I, Demetrius I, Euthydemus II, Pantaleon, Agathocles, and Antimachus I. In doing so it proposes a new, soundly based history of the Graeco-Bactrian kingdom under these kings based on a thorough understanding and suggested reconstruction of these enigmatic coins.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Simon Glenn is Digital Curator of Early Modern European in the Heberden Coin Room at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Oxford. He was previously a research fellow of the same institution where he has worked on both Greek and Roman numismatics. He has been a member of the Coin Hoards of the Roman Empire, Roman Provincial Coinage, Ancient Coins as Related Cultural Heritage, and the Oxford-Paris Alexander projects. He is a graduate of the University of Edinburgh and completed his PhD at the University of Oxford (Wolfson College), the research of which provides the basis for this book. He is a fellow and council member of the Royal Numismatic Society, and is a member of the American Numismatic Society.

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Hidden Power

ns42Late Cistophoric Production and the Organization of  Provincia Asia (128–89 BC)
(Numismatic Studies 42)

by Lucia Francesca Carbone

List price: $100 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $70 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404X
ISBN 978-0-89722-363-8
Hardcover, vii + 266 text pages, b/w figs., 142 b/w plates containing images of 1,737 coins.

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Using the production and circulation patterns of the Asian cistophorus as a case study, Hidden Power seeks to develop a better understanding of Roman monetary policy in the province of Asia between its establishment in the 120s BC and the beginning of the Mithraditic Wars.

Hidden Power catalogues and illustrates some 1,737 cistophoric tetradrachms and fractions from the mints of Ephesus, Pergamum, Tralles, Laodicea, Apamea, Adramyteum, Nysa, and Smyrna. Most of the coins included in the study are late cistophori, issues between 134.3 BC and the 60s BC.

Appendix I provides a discussion of the late cistophori of Tralles struck after 89 BC, showing not only the direct correlation between cistophori and Roman military campaigns, but also Roman taxation.

In Appendix II, circulation data have been combined with data derived from the Tralles die study in order to calculate cistophoric production for the entirety of provincia Asia until the end of the late cistophori. This estimate provides a means to assess the financial impact of Roman taxation and exploitation by Roman imperatores over the course of the first half of the first century BC.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lucia Carbone is an ancient historian and numismatist who holds BA and MA degrees from Università Sapienza (Rome) as well as MPhil and PhD degrees from Columbia University (New York). She is currently the Assistant Curator for Roman Coins at the American Numismatic Society. Her main research interest is the impact of Roman imperialism on the monetary and administrative systems of the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire between the second and first centuries BC.

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Old Regime France and its Jetons

ns41Pointillist History and Numismatics
(Numismatic Studies 41)

by James E. McClellan III

List price: $100 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $70 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404X
ISBN 978-0-89722-362-1
Hardcover, xiii + 268 text pages, b/w figs.

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Non-monetary tokens known as jetons originated as counters used on medieval counting tables. In certain parts of France, the Low Countries, and German lands, they continued as such into the nineteenth century. The historical and numismatic interest in jetons stems more from what else they became, particularly though the end of the eighteenth century under the Bourbon monarchs, as perks of office for office holders in the burgeoning nation state of France, New Year’s Day presents exchanged among certain segments of society, and lagniappe handed out for attendance at meetings in town halls, regional estates, and learned societies. Jetons figured in the rites and rituals of the guilds and faculties; they were swag for general meetings of the clergy, and they served as calling cards for noble families. Decoding hidden messages became a parlor game for cognoscenti, and as “petit monuments” some jetons are miniature works of high art produced by the world’s most talented artists/engravers at the world’s preeminent mint. In this book jetons serve as microdots in a pointillist, longue durée account that paints a grand portrait of early modern and Old Regime France leading up to the French Revolution.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

James E. McClellan III is professor emeritus of the history of science at Stevens Institute of Technology. He has published widely on eighteenth-century French science, scientific institutions, scientific publications, and science and colonial expansion. Decades ago, from his work on French academies, Jim learned of jetons de présence—little silver tokens handed out for attendance at academy meetings—and he began collecting jetons. Along the way he encountered an unexpected divide separating communities of historians and numismatists specializing in early modern and Old Regime France, and he decided to investigate. He came to see that through the lens of these tiny, almost trivial artifacts from the past, a vast panorama opens up on the whole of society and culture of France through to the French Revolution. This book is the result of that inquiry, proving once again just how contingent the course of historical research actually is.

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Connections, Communities, and Coinage

WatsonCoverThe System of Coin Production in Southern Asia Minor, AD 218–276
(Numismatic Studies 39)

by George Watson

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Member price: $70 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-358-4
Hardcover, 588 text pages, b/w plates

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The chief aim of the book is to address the system of coin production in the regions of Pamphylia, Pisidia and Cilicia during the third century AD. As in much of the Roman East, cities in these regions produced their own bronze coinage, but that this was in some respects collaboratively achieved is shown by the use of the same obverse dies by two or more cities, as well as the appearance of the same engraving style in multiple cities. The most comprehensive study of these phenomena to date is the work of Konrad Kraft, Das System der kaiserzeitlichen Münzprägung in Kleinasien, which was published posthumously in 1972. The book not only examines these questions in an area which was not explored in detail by Kraft, but also radically reappraises his conclusions and opens up new avenues of investigation.

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The Early Antigonids

AntigonidsCoverCoinage, Money, and the Economy
(Numismatic Studies 37)

by Katerina Panagopoulou

List price: $150 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $105 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-355-3
Hardcover, xlv + 388 text pages, b/w figures and 64 plates

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This systematic analysis of the gold and silver coinages of “King Antigonos” is intended to explore the nature of the Antigonid cash economy during the second and the third quarter of the third century BC. The author’s principal aim in reconstructing the precious metal coinage of “King Antigonos” is to comprehend the way in which the mints concerned functioned and to identify the major issues of the period. This helps us to answer questions such as, whether or not production was continuous; on which occasions/for which purposes the mints operated; where and why the coins produced circulated and what their value at the time was; finally, whether these issues outlasted their initiator, Antigonos Gonatas. The macroeconomic profile of Antigonid Makedonia during this period is completed by an attempt to quantify and to contextualize these Antigonid silver issues. Explanations other than military for the production of this coinage are explored and the chronology and the role of those silver coins issued posthumously in the name of Alexander that are currently assigned to the early reign of Gonatas are reconsidered. Finally, the geographical distribution of these Antigonid issues is reassessed.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Katerina Panagopoulou (BA Athens, 1993, PhD London, 2000) is Assistant Professor in Ancient History at the University of Crete / Greece, holding currently a 2019–2020 Harvard University CCS-CHS Fellowship in Comparative Cultural Studies in Greece and having previously held fellowships at the Universities of Princeton and Oxford. She has also worked at the Hellenic Open University, (as a Research Assistant) at the Centre for Greek and Roman Antiquity / Hellenic Research Foundation (1993–1994) and at the Foundation of the Hellenic World. Her research interests encompass ancient numismatics, the economic behavior of precious metals (Hellenistic and Roman), Macedonian demography, politics and economy, Social Network Analysis and economic history, Hellenistic and Roman social history. Publications include: “Between Federal and Ethnic: The Koinon Makedonon and the Makedones Revisited,” in H. Beck, K. Buraselis and Alex McAuley (eds.), Ethnos and Koinon, Studies in Ancient Greek Ethnicity and Federalism (Stuttgart, 2019), 363–383; (ed., with Prof. I. Malkin and Dr. Christy Constantakopoulou), Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean (London, 2009).

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Concordia Disciplinarum

Essays on Ancient Coinage, History, and Archaeology
in Honor of William E. Metcalf
Concordia-Cover

(Numismatic Studies 38)

Edited by Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans

List price: $75 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $52.50 plus shipping & handling

ISSN 051-7404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-357-7
Hardcover, 283 pages, b/w images, color frontispiece

CONTENTS

Editors’ Preface, by Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans

Bibliography of William E. Metcalf

List of Abbreviations

Scythian-Greek Relations in the North and Northwestern Black Sea Area (6th–5th centuries BC): Numismatic Evidence, by Elena Stolyarik

The Process of Monetization from Athens to Egypt: Evidence and Models, by Andrew Hogan

The Thrace (?) ca. 1955 Hoard (IGCH 738), by Peter van Alfen

Numismatic Evidence for Compound Numbers Written in Greek Alphabetic Numerals, by Paul Keyser

The Asia Minor 1949 Hoard (IGCH 1450) at the American Numismatic Society, by Constantin A. Marinescu

Seeing Caesar’s Symbols: Religious Implements on the Coins of Julius Caesar and his Successors, by Roberta Stewart

A New Revival of an Old Coin Type: Sardis in the Augustan Era, by Jane DeRose Evans

Earthquakes in Asia Minor, the cura provinciae of Tiberius and the Cities, by Bernhard Weisser

A Neronian Overstrike at the Harvard Art Museums, by Carmen Arnold-Biucchi and Rebecca A. Katz

The Flavian Colosseum Sestertii and Imperial Praise, by Nathan T. Elkins

The Forum of Domitian on his Coins, by Ben Lee Damsky

Roma at Corinth: The Coins and the Monument, by Mary Hoskins Walbank

Le monnayage émis à Silandos de Lydie sous Septime Sévère, by Michel Amandry

The Coinage of Septimius Severus and the Battle of Lugdunum, by Gary Reger

Imperial Representation and Distributional Politics under Severus Alexander, by Carlos F. Noreña

Quantifying the Size of a Coinage: Die Studies or Coin Finds, by Roger Bland

An Aureus of Allectus with a Remarkable Pedigree, by Andrew Burnett

Interaction with Coins in the Liberalitas Relief on the Arch of Constantine, by Martin Beckmann

A Double-Obverse Bronze of the Constantinian Period from the Antioch Excavations, by Alan M. Stahl and Rafail Zoulis

The Ascension of Julian: Ammianus Marcellinus 20.4, by Sarah E. Cox

Index

FROM THE PREFACE

William E. Metcalf is a prominent name in numismatics, but is also universally recognized among those who study Roman history and archaeology. Known especially for his many contributions to Roman and Byzantine coinage, it is difficult to find a book or article that does not cite his work. A generous scholar, one can see his name in the acknowledgements in works by numismatists and scholars in adjacent disciplines who incorporate numismatic evidence. It is thus appropriate— and overdue—that his former students and colleagues present this Festschrift in recognition of Metcalf ’s impact on our discipline. It would be impossible to incorporate contributions from all of his colleagues and friends; the contributors herein represent but a fraction of those who would honor him.

His articles and reviews number in the hundreds, and he is author and editor of several books. Some of his best-known research centers on the cistophori. In 1980, he published his doctoral dissertation as his first monograph: The Cistophori of Hadrian (New York: American Numismatic Society, Numismatic Studies 15). Continuing this work is his recent The Later Republican Cistophori (New York: American Numismatic Society, Numismatic Notes and Monographs 170, 2017). A mark of his place in the entire field of numismatics is his editorship of The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012). Although retired from teaching and curating, he continues his research, and is currently completing Roman Provincial Coinage X (Valerian to Diocletian).

Bill, as he is called by friends and colleagues, received his degrees from the University of Michigan. He was awarded his A.B. in Latin, with distinction and highest honors, in 1969, his A.M. in Classical Studies in 1970, and his Ph.D. in Classical Studies in 1973. That same year, he came to New York to begin his long association with the American Numismatic Society, where he would work until 2000. From 1973 to 1975, he served as Assistant Curator of Roman and Byzantine Coins; in 1975, he was promoted to Associate Curator, and in 1978, to Deputy Chief Curator. He succeeded Margaret Thompson as Chief Curator in 1979, and remained in this position until his departure in 2000. Presently, he is Honorary Curator and Life Fellow at the ANS. While serving at the ANS, Bill was appointed Visiting Professor or Adjunct Professor at several institutions, including Columbia University, Princeton University, Università degli Studi di Padova, Bryn Mawr College, Rutgers University, and New York University. In 2002, he was hired as the Curator of Coins and Medals at the Yale University Art Gallery and as Professor of Classics (adj.) at Yale University. In 2007, with the endowment of his curatorial position, he was named Ben Lee Damsky Curator of Coins and Medals, a title that he held until his retirement from Yale in 2014. Prof. Metcalf holds many distinguished honors and awards that recognize his research. Some key highlights are his membership at the Institute for Advanced Study in 1988–1989, his election as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1998, and his receipt of the Jeton de Vermeil of the Société Française de Numismatique in 2008. He is also the honorand of the annual William E. Metcalf Lecture Series of the Archaeological Institute of America, established in 2000 by Anna Maguerite McCann.

Among the people who influenced Bill’s professional development, two stand out. The first is Theodore “Ted” V. Buttrey (1929–2018), his mentor and advisor for his Ph.D. It was Ted who introduced him to the discipline of numismatics, involving him in the publication of the coins from the University of Michigan’s excavations at Carthage. These initial studies led to Bill’s interest and expertise in Roman Provincial coins (see also Metcalf 1977, 1979a, 1982b, 1987a, 1989, 2000, 2002a, 2007, 2008a, 2014, 2017) and the publication of hoards and excavation coins (Metcalf 1974a, 1974b 1975a, 1975b, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979b, 1979c, 1980, 1981a, 1981b, 1982a, 1987b, 1988, 19912, 1994, 1995/6, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002b). Ted’s ability to question received knowledge is clearly reflected in Bill’s careful arguments and fresh insights.

At the American Numismatic Society, he met his supervisor, mentor, and friend, the redoubtable Margaret Thompson (1911–1992). She exemplified for him unstinting work on behalf of the American Numismatic Society, the conduct of scholarly discourse, and the interest in bodies of material beyond the cataloging of particular coin types.

Teaching the next generation of numismatic scholars has been part of Bill’s life, as the two editors of this volume can attest. He has promoted the work of numismatics by introducing younger scholars to established scholars and collectors, and to dig directors who need numismatists for their excavations. His careful reading of forthcoming manuscripts has saved many an error or half-baked idea from going to readers or editors. His service to the field is reflected in his reviews of manuscripts and books, and service on the editorial boards for Lexicon Mythologiae Classicae, American Journal of Archaeology, Journal of Roman Archaeology, American Journal of Numismatics, Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, and Bryn Mawr Classical Review, and on various committees for the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) and the Archaeological Institute of America.

We offer this book in gratitude, as a reflection of Bill’s interests and deep scholarship, and an homage to his friendship and teaching.

Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans, May 2018

 

Roman Coins, Money, and Society in Elizabethan England

OWRF-cover(Numismatic Studies 36)

by Richard Simpson, Andrew Burnett, and Deborah Thorpe

List price: $80 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $55 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-352-2
Hardcover, 230 text pages, 34 b/w figures

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The idea of publishing Sir Thomas Smith’s On the Wages of the Roman Footsoldier (OWRF) grew out of the successful conference held at the Society of Antiquaries of London in December 2013 to mark the 500th anniversary of Smith’s birth. OWRF is virtually unknown to modern scholarship, and, although it is the first original work written in England to use the evidence of ancient coins, it has previously played no part in the history of numismatics. Yet it clearly deserves to be better known, both for that reason and for many others. It throws new light on the “Cambridge circle,” the group of academics-turned-politicians who played a crucial role in the smooth accession of Elizabeth I. It allows us to reconstruct something of the humanistic interest in numismatics, adumbrated earlier in the century by Tunstall and More, but otherwise only returning to visibility with the work of Camden, Cotton, and the Elizabethan College of Antiquaries. It provides another strand to our knowledge of the importance of the Roman precedent in both influencing contemporary thought and having a direct bearing on contemporary politics.

Sir Thomas Smith, like many of his works, has also slipped from public awareness, overshadowed in the modern imagination by contemporaries like Cecil, Walsingham, or Gresham. Yet Smith was one of the most important politicians and intellectuals of the day; a brilliant academic career at Cambridge was followed by his active participation in politics under Edward VI, Mary, and Elizabeth. He played a leading role in the controversial reform of Greek pronunciation, he introduced a new style of continental architecture to England, and he wrote analyses of the politics of his day, including his views on the relations between the monarch and parliament, views which were to be seized on in the crisis of the 17th century in a way which would no doubt have startled Smith, had he lived to see it.

For this reason the publication of the OWRF is accompanied by Richard Simpson’s personal and intellectual biography of this most important of the “missing persons” of the 16th century. The biography is intended partly to remedy some of the misconceptions about Smith, but, more importantly to set OWRF and his other writings in a coherent  biographical framework.

Roman Coins, Money, and Society in Elizabethan England is a work of scrupulous scholarship . . . . a book that will demand a place in every scholarly numismatic library, public and personal.”

—David Dykes, British Numismatic Journal 88 (2018), pp. 241–43.

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A Monetary History of Central America

Central America(Numismatic Studies 35)

by Brian Stickney

List price: $99 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $49.95 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-350-8
Hardcover, 386 text pages, 630 b/w figures

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A Monetary History of Central America takes a comprehensive approach to analyze the political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the evolution of coinage and medals in Central America. Beginning with the discovery of the New World, the book seeks to determine how and why the many monetary regimes evolved, were sustained, and ultimately replaced throughout both the Colonial and Independence eras. The author has assembled new and revised mintage figures for coins and medals, which, combined with historical data about withdrawals and demonization, allows a much better understanding of this material. The book provides insight into the influence of international monetary conferences and unions on Central America and its evolving coinage. Each chapter focuses on the monetary history of one country, updating the bibliography to reflect current scholarship, and presenting a nearly complete representation of every minted type, many from the author’s collection. The book includes a thumbnail chronology of political and monetary events from 1500–1965, a glossary of terms, and gold and silver production and ratio tables throughout the centuries.

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Coins, Artists, and Tyrants: Syracuse in the Time of the Peloponnesian War

(Numismatic Studies 33)

by Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert
Ute Wartenberg, Editor
with selected passages from L. O. Tudeer,
Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Syrakus in der Periode der signierenden Künstler
translated by Orla Mulholland,
and a biographical sketch about Tudeer by Tuukka Talvio

List price: $200 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $140 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-341-6
Hardcover, 400 text pages, b/w figures, 27 b/w plates, hoards pull-out, signed tetradrachms pull-out, color die-link chart pull-out

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Coins, Artists, and Tyrants contains the first fully translated and revised text of Lauri O. Tudeer, Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Syrakus in der Periode der signierenden Künstler, as well as a biography of Tudeer, plus a completely new evaluation of signed coin dies and the artists who produced them. Over 100 years after its first publication, Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert completely updates the scholarship and bibliography on signed Syracusan tetradrachms, making this book the single most important source on the subject. The book includes plates, a full-color die-link chart, and three pull-outs featuring Syracusan tetradrachms and hoards.

Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert is an independent scholar specializing in Archaic and Classical coinages of the Greeks including their barbarous neighbours in both the Balkans and the Levant. He has been on the staff of the German Archaeological Institute at Athens and has also worked with the excavation teams at Boğazköy-Hattuša and Karatepe/Cilicia in Turkey. He has published widely, and has taught Classics and Ancient Numismatics at the Freie Universität, Berlin, and at Vienna University. He currently holds a post-doc at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for the Study of Ancient Culture.

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Wealth and Warfare: The Archaeology of Money in Ancient Syria

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(Numismatic Studies 34)

by Frédérique Duyrat

List price: $200 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $140 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-346-1
Hardcover, 600 text pages with tables, b/w figures

This volume is the first comprehensive look at Syrian coin hoards and excavation finds. It contains full catalogues of every coin hoard and a selection of published excavation finds from the area covered by modern Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian territories through 2010. Duyrat explores the definitions of “hoard” and “treasure”, examines the circulation of currency in the ancient Levant, and considers how excavation coins as well as the phenomenon of coin hoard discoveries are affected by political choices and warfare in modern states in conflict. The book focusses on the monetary effects of the military upheavals of the Achaemenid and Hellenistic periods but also on what coins can tell us of the form and distribution of private wealth in ancient Syrian society. It offers a bold new methodology for the examination of the monetary history of an entire region. This is essential reading for anyone seriously interested in the origin of coin hoards in Syria, how war effects the archaeological record, and how to reconstitute the history of ancient societies through the lens of numismatics.

Frédérique Duyrat is director of the Department of Coins, Medals, and Antiques of the Bibliothèque nationale de France and is associated with the research team Orient et Méditerranée—Mondes sémitiques (University of Paris–Sorbonne) and the Ecole doctorale Archéologie of the University of Paris I–Panthéon Sorbonne. Prior to this she spent two years as a researcher at the Institut français d’archéologie du Proche-Orient in Damascus, eight years as assistant professor of Greek history at the University of Orléans, and three years as Curator of Greek coins at the Bibliothèque nationale de France. She is editor of Trésors Monétaires, a director of the Revue Numismatique, and a member of the board of the Société française de numismatique. She has written and edited more than 50 books and articles on the coinage, history, and archaeology of ancient Syria and Phoenicia.