A Numismatic History of Central America

Central America(Numismatic Studies 35)

by Brian Stickney

List price: $99 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $49.95 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-350-8
Hardcover, 386 text pages, 630 b/w figures

A Monetary History of Central America takes a comprehensive approach to analyze the political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the evolution of coinage and medals in Central America. Beginning with the discovery of the New World, the book seeks to determine how and why the many monetary regimes evolved, were sustained, and ultimately replaced throughout both the Colonial and Independence eras. The author has assembled new and revised mintage figures for coins and medals, which, combined with historical data about withdrawals and demonization, allows a much better understanding of this material. The book provides insight into the influence of international monetary conferences and unions on Central America and its evolving coinage. Each chapter focuses on the monetary history of one country, updating the bibliography to reflect current scholarship, and presenting a nearly complete representation of every minted type, many from the author’s collection. The book includes a thumbnail chronology of political and monetary events from 1500–1965, a glossary of terms, and gold and silver production and ratio tables throughout the centuries.

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Order this title from our distributor, Casemate Academic/Oxbow Books. ANS Members, use your discount code at checkout. Forgot the code? Email Emma Pratte, or call 212.571.4470 x117.

Coins, Artists, and Tyrants: Syracuse in the Time of the Peloponnesian War

(Numismatic Studies 33)

by Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert
Ute Wartenberg, Editor
with selected passages from L. O. Tudeer,
Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Syrakus in der Periode der signierenden Künstler
translated by Orla Mulholland,
and a biographical sketch about Tudeer by Tuukka Talvio

List price: $200 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $140 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-341-6
Hardcover, 400 text pages, b/w figures, 27 b/w plates, hoards pull-out, signed tetradrachms pull-out, color die-link chart pull-out

Coins, Artists, and Tyrants contains the first fully translated and revised text of Lauri O. Tudeer, Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Syrakus in der Periode der signierenden Künstler, as well as a biography of Tudeer, plus a completely new evaluation of signed coin dies and the artists who produced them. Over 100 years after its first publication, Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert completely updates the scholarship and bibliography on signed Syracusan tetradrachms, making this book the single most important source on the subject. The book includes plates, a full-color die-link chart, and three pull-outs featuring Syracusan tetradrachms and hoards.

Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert is an independent scholar specializing in Archaic and Classical coinages of the Greeks including their barbarous neighbours in both the Balkans and the Levant. He has been on the staff of the German Archaeological Institute at Athens and has also worked with the excavation teams at Boğazköy-Hattuša and Karatepe/Cilicia in Turkey. He has published widely, and has taught Classics and Ancient Numismatics at the Freie Universität, Berlin, and at Vienna University. He currently holds a post-doc at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for the Study of Ancient Culture.

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Order this title from our distributor, Casemate Academic/Oxbow Books. ANS Members, use your discount code at checkout. Forgot the code? Email Emma Pratte, or call 212.571.4470 x117.

Wealth and Warfare: The Archaeology of Money in Ancient Syria

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(Numismatic Studies 34)

by Frédérique Duyrat

List price: $200 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $140 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-346-1
Hardcover, 600 text pages with tables, b/w figures

This volume is the first comprehensive look at Syrian coin hoards and excavation finds. It contains full catalogues of every coin hoard and a selection of published excavation finds from the area covered by modern Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian territories through 2010. Duyrat explores the definitions of “hoard” and “treasure”, examines the circulation of currency in the ancient Levant, and considers how excavation coins as well as the phenomenon of coin hoard discoveries are affected by political choices and warfare in modern states in conflict. The book focusses on the monetary effects of the military upheavals of the Achaemenid and Hellenistic periods but also on what coins can tell us of the form and distribution of private wealth in ancient Syrian society. It offers a bold new methodology for the examination of the monetary history of an entire region. This is essential reading for anyone seriously interested in the origin of coin hoards in Syria, how war effects the archaeological record, and how to reconstitute the history of ancient societies through the lens of numismatics.

Frédérique Duyrat is director of the Department of Coins, Medals, and Antiques of the Bibliothèque nationale de France and is associated with the research team Orient et Méditerranée—Mondes sémitiques (University of Paris–Sorbonne) and the Ecole doctorale Archéologie of the University of Paris I–Panthéon Sorbonne. Prior to this she spent two years as a researcher at the Institut français d’archéologie du Proche-Orient in Damascus, eight years as assistant professor of Greek history at the University of Orléans, and three years as Curator of Greek coins at the Bibliothèque nationale de France. She is editor of Trésors Monétaires, a director of the Revue Numismatique, and a member of the board of the Société française de numismatique. She has written and edited more than 50 books and articles on the coinage, history, and archaeology of ancient Syria and Phoenicia.

Irritamenta: Numismatic Treasures of a Renaissance Collector

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(Numismatic Studies 31)

by John Cunnally

List price: $200 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $140 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-342-3
Hardcover, slipcased 2-vol. set, 414 text pages with b/w figures, 330 color plates

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Handsomely bound in red leather, MS Typ 411 is one of thousands of rare editions, manuscripts, and documents in the Houghton Library’s Printing and Graphic Arts section at Harvard University. Resembling an old fashioned family Bible at 10 × 8 inches and some 300 pages, when opened this book reveals no text but a series of fine pen-and-ink drawings, 1,220 illustrations of ancient coins. These are the records of a coin collection owned by Andrea Loredan, a Venetian patrician well known in the 1550s and ‘60s as a passionate connoisseur of antiquities. Silver tetradrachms of Athens and Alexander the Great, aurei of Philip and Augustus, denarii of Caesar and his assassins, large Imperial sestertii of Nero and Hadrian, the numismatic images were intended to delight the eye, stir the curiosity, and enflame the acquisitive instincts of prospective buyers, at a time when the cash-strapped patrician was seeking to liquidate the ancient treasures of his private museum. The volume was, in essence, a sales catalogue, a species of book not often sought out and admired for artistic or literary merit. Yet Loredan and his unknown draftsman, unaware of how they were benefiting future scholars, produced a graphic masterpiece of elegance and charm, a document of the highest importance for the study of Renaissance antiquarianism, humanism, and archaeology.

The author first encountered MS Typ 411 while working on his survey of Renaissance numismatic literature, Images of the Illustrious: the manuscript is mentioned in a footnote by Ruth Mortimer in one of her catalogues of 16th century printed books at the Harvard Library. The drawings at that time were attributed to the Mantuan goldsmith and antiquary Jacopo Strada (ca. 1515–1588), one of the numismatic authors in whose career Cunnally was interested, and a prolific producer of albums depicting ancient coins. Cunnally’s initial reaction on first examining MS Typ 411 in person was to doubt not only the attribution to Strada, but the 16th century date itself. Surely these careful drawings, so attentive to nuances of inscription and detail such as mint-marks and magistrates’ initials, were the product of a much later, more sophisticated period of numismatic research, no earlier than the time of Eckhel and Mionnet in the late 18th or early 19th century. Particularly modern was the draftsman’s practice of varying the size of the coin drawings to replicate the actual dimensions of the pieces, which vary from tiny fractional silver to large bronze medallions. The usual routine in 16th century numismatic books was to show the coins as uniform in size, sometimes accompanied by a Greek letter keyed to a scale of concentric or nested circles printed at the front or back of the book. But the physical evidence of the watermarks and binding, as well as contemporary documents reporting the contents of Loredan’s collection and his creation of an album of drawings to help him sell it, quickly dispelled any skepticism, and we can safely assign the origin of the manuscript to Venice, and its date to around 1560.

With this date and locale established, the significance of MS Typ 411 for students of Renaissance antiquarianism cannot be overstated. While written descriptions and even partial catalogues of some Renaissance coin collections have come down to us—for example, the Greek and Roman silver of Cardinal Pietro Barbo, the future Pope Paul II, inventoried in 1457, and the 800 gold coins owned by Duke Ercole II of Ferrara, recorded by his courtier Celio Calcagnini around 1540—the Houghton manuscript is unique in offering an album of pictures of a complete Renaissance collection. And whereas the written catalogues are often informative enough to allow us to identify the type of coin described in the text, in the Loredan manuscript the abundance of detail permits a modern numismatist to pinpoint an item more precisely to a particular issue, and sometimes to a particular die, based on subsidiary symbols and variations of the portrait that are overlooked in written descriptions. In a few cases, such as that of Loredan’s tetradrachm of the First Region of Macedon bearing monograms of two magistrates, or a bronze of Bostra showing the head of Elagabalus, the unique markings or surviving letters displayed in the drawing can be matched with a high degree of probability to only a single coin existing in a modern collection. The importance of this information for numismatists interested in the provenance of the objects they study, and intrigued by evidence of rare coins known to earlier collectors but no longer extant, is obvious.

For art historians such as Cunnally who specialize in tracing the survival and revival of antiquity during the Renaissance, continually asking the “Watergate” questions—what did they know and when did they know it?—the Loredan manuscript is a precious witness to the abundance and variety of ancient numismatic material available to the artists, as well as their patrons and public, during that period. Art historians searching for the antique sources available to Titian, Palladio, Sansovino, and other Venetian masters of the Cinquecento should find the drawings of MS Typ 411 particularly interesting.

John Cunnally is an associate professor of Art and Visual Culture specializing in Renaissance art history at Iowa State University.

Reviewed in Coins Weekly (March 2, 2017)

The Banknotes of the Imperial Bank of Persia: An Analysis of a Complex System with Catalogue

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(Numismatic Studies 30, 2016)

by Michael E. Bonine
edited by Jere L. Bacharach
List price: US$100
ANS Members Price $70.00

ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-337-9
Hardcover, 148 pp., color images throughout, color plates

The Imperial Bank of Persia, established in 1889, was the first bank to issue banknotes and attempt to establish a modern banking system in Iran. Since it was established as the first State Bank of Iran but was also a British bank, many tensions developed between the bank and the Iranian government. Constant rivalry between the British and the Russians for influence and control of Iran influenced how and where the branch banks were established and operated.

The banknotes of the Imperial Bank of Persia are some of the most beautiful and largest notes ever issued for any nation, yet the story of these notes is complex. There are very few remaining specimens, especially of the earliest notes and those of higher denominations. An elaborate system of branch banks evolved, and the banknotes were printed or stamped as payable only for the issuing branch.

With the emergence of Reza Shah and the Pahlavi dynasty in the mid-1920s, the desire of Iranians to control their own national bank and curtail the influence of the British led to establishment of the Bank Melli Iran (National Bank of Iran). By 1932 the right of the Imperial Bank of Persia to issue banknotes had been withdrawn.

Few researchers have examined the subject in detail, and general references often have inaccurate information. The following study by Michael Bonine attempts to fill in some of the gaps and includes an analysis of several hundred lower-denomination banknotes.

Contents:

Preface by the Editor
The Banknotes of the Imperial Bank of Persia
The Origins of the Imperial Bank of Persia
The Designs and Denominations
The Lion-and-Sun Motif
The Portrait of Naser al-Din Shah
The System of Branch Banks
The Issuing of Imperial Bank Notes
The Date Stamps
The “Payable at” Stamps
The Official Seal of the Government of Persia
The Signatures
Number of Issued Notes, Prefix Letters, and Serial Numbers
The Enigmatic 2nd Series 20 Toman Banknote
Placement of the Serial Numbers
Canceling and Destroying Notes
Robberies and Lost Notes
Survival of Imperial Bank of Persia Banknotes
Afterword by the Editor
References
Catalogue
Appendix A: Series and Denominations
Appendix B: Branch Banks

Michael E. Bonine (1942–2011) was an active member of the University of Arizona’s Departments of Near Eastern Studies and Geography, and founding director of Arizona’s School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies. He published extensively on the human and physical geography of the Middle East. He also turned his hobby of collecting into a scholarly activity as he systematically acquired banknotes of the Imperial Bank of Persia. Extensive research, particularly in London, and painstaking studies of the eighteen denominations printed for the twenty-eight bank branches resulted in this monograph on the Imperial Bank of Persia banknotes.

Monuments in Miniature: Architecture on Roman Coinage

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(Numismatic Studies Volume 29, 2015)

by Nathan T. Elkins
List price: US$100
ANS Members Price $70.00

ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-344-7
Hardcover, 240 pp.

The representation of monuments and buildings on Roman coinage is one of the most popular topics in studies of coin iconography. In addition to numismatists, it attracts the attention of historians, art historians, archaeologists, and topographers. Although the subject of numerous books and articles, architectural representations have been appreciated primarily for the evidence they might yield for a monument’s appearance or existence. This approach is limited as the methodologies applied are often narrow or inconsistent and often betray modern biases. Instead of using images on coins as evidence for reconstruction, this book contextualizes monumental representations on the coinage within their broader historical, social, and political contexts, by addressing how and why images evolved through time and by investigating why architectural representation emerged on and disappeared from the coinage. In so doing, this book also treats all incidences of architectural representation on the Republican and Imperial coinages in order to provide the first comprehensive treatment of architecture on the state-sanctioned coinage. This book is, therefore, a resource to a broad range of specialists interested in the phenomenon of architectural representation and its significance in the Roman world.

Contents:

Introduction: A New Look at Architectural Representations on Roman Coinage
Chapter 1. The Emergence of Architectural Designs on the Coinage of the Roman Republic
Chapter 2. Architectural Coin Types in the Early Roman Empire (Augustus through Severus Alexander)
Chapter 3. Late Roman Architectural Coin Types (The “Soldier Emperors” through Valentinian III)
Chapter 4. Architectural Coin Types from the Roman Provinces: Characteristics, Derivation, and Influence
Conclusions: Architectural Coin Types as a Reflection of Roman Society
Appendix 1. Roman Architectural Coin Types (135 bc–Severus Alexander)
Appendix 2. Architectural Coin Types of the “Soldier Emperors”
Appendix 3. Architectural Coin Types of the Tetrarchy and its Collapse to c. AD 313
Appendix 4. Architectural Coin Types from Constantine and Licinius to Valentinian III
Bibliography

Nathan Elkins earned his BA in archaeology and Classical studies at the University of Evansville before earning his MA in the City of Rome at the University of Reading (UK) and PhD in Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. This book resulted from his 2004 attendance at the Eric P. Newman Graduate Seminar in Numismatics at the ANS. Elkins is currently an assistant professor of art history at Baylor University.

Money of the American Colonies and Confederation

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(Numismatic Studies 20, 1992)

by Philip L. Mossman

Hardcover, 312 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-249-5
ISBN-10: 0-89722-249-0
Price: US$100.00

Read/Download via HathiTrust (Open Access).

Contents:

Preface
Bibliography
Chapter One: The Economic Relationship Between England and her North American
Colonies
Chapter Two: Money in Early America: Wampum, Commodities, Foreign Coins
Chapter Three: Massachusetts and Maryland Silver Coinage
Chapter Four: Colonial Paper Currency
Chapter Five: The Emergence of Copper Coinage
Chapter Six: The New Constellation
Chapter Seven: Coinage of the Confederation Period
Chapter Eight: The Coppers Panic of 1789
Chapter Nine: Toward a More Perfect Union
Appendix 1: Conversion into Various Monies of Account
Appendix 2: Summary of Overstruck Coppers
Appendix 3: Assay Calculations
Appendix 4: Weight Distribution Analyses of Confederation Coppers
Appendix 5: “A Treatise on Copper Coins”

From Crime to Punishment: Counterfeit and Debased Currencies in Colonial and Pre-Federal America

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(Numismatic Studies 27, 2012)

by Philip L. Mossman

Hardcover: 304 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-327-0
Price: $49.98 (no Member discount)
Limited number of signed copies: see below

Ever since coinage was developed in ancient Lydia, an element of society has sought to debase the coin of the realm for personal gain not only by counterfeiting, but also by shaving away precious metal. Currency debasement was not confined to the proletariat since throughout history various monarchs increased their royal revenues, or seigniorage, by reducing the quality of the coins’ specie content or its weight standard. The current text follows closely the course of royal English copper coinages whose high potential profit made them an ideal prey for counterfeiters. These forgeries flowed freely into the colonies where they overwhelmed, and eventually collapsed, the small change medium but not before various states sought to correct the evil of this imported copper trash.

Great attention is paid to Great Britain’s mercantilistic policies which shaped the character of the currency in the North American colonies where chronic hard money shortages encouraged counterfeit coinages of all stripes whose actual manufacture and circulation is examined in great detail. Colonists further sought to expand their monetary pool by printing bills of credit to meet the exigencies of the French and Indian Wars. This new paper currency likewise became the target for forgery and a battle royal ensued between the colonial treasurers and bands of counterfeiters as they competed to outsmart each other. But as “the weed of crime bears bitter fruit,” many counterfeiters were apprehended and punished for their evil deeds.

Contents:

Chapter One: The Landscape of Counterfeit Money
Chapter Two: Pre-1700 Counterfeiting
Chapter Three: Who’s Who in Counterfeiting
Chapter Four: “Counterfeiting 101”
Chapter Five: English Copper Coinages
Chapter Six: State Coppers to the Rescue
Chapter Seven: Genuine Paper Money
Chapter Eight: Altered Paper Money
Chapter Nine: Counterfeit Paper Money
Chapter Ten: Laws and Penalties

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Studies on Early Byzantine Gold Coinage

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(Numismatic Studies 17, 1988)

edited by Wolfgang Hahn and William E. Metcalf

Hardcover, 142 pp., 24 pls.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-225-9
ISBN-10: 0-89722-225-3
Price: US$24.98 (no Member discount)

Contents:

Introduction (Wolfgang Hahn and William E. Metcalf)
The Joint Reign Gold of Justin I and Justinian I (William E. Metcalf)
The Monte Judica Hoard and the Sicilian Moneta Auri under Justininan I and Justin II (Niall Fairhead and Wolfgang Hahn)
Carthage: The Moneta Auri under Justinian I and Justin II, 537–578 (Cécile Morrisson)
The Minting of Gold Coinage at Thessalonica in the Fifth and Sixth Centuries and the Gold Currency of Illyricum and Dalmatia (D. M. Metcalf)
Seventh-Century Byzantine Coins in Southern Russia and the Problem of Light Weight Solidi (John Smedley)
Microchemical Analysis of the Metal Content of Some Eight-Century Coins of Rome and Ravenna (Wolfgang Hahn)
The Debasement of the Provincial Byzantine Gold Coinage from the Seventh to Ninth Centuries (W. A. Oddy)

Alexander’s Drachm Mints II: Lampsacus and Abydus

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(Numismatic Studies 19, 1991)

by Margaret Thompson

Hardcover, 77 pp., 34 pls.
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-241-9
ISBN-10: 0-89722-241-5

Price: US$55.00

Contents:

Lampsacus
Attribution
Catalogue and Commentaries
Synopsis of the Coinage
Chronology
Abydus
Attribution
Catalogue and Commentaries
Synopsis of the Coinage
Chronology
Hoards
Alphabetical Listing
Gold Silver
Hoard Chart