The Banknotes of the Imperial Bank of Persia: An Analysis of a Complex System with Catalogue

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(Numismatic Studies 30, 2016)

by Michael E. Bonine
edited by Jere L. Bacharach
List price: US$100
ANS Members Price $70.00

ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-337-9
Hardcover, 148 pp., color images throughout, color plates

The Imperial Bank of Persia, established in 1889, was the first bank to issue banknotes and attempt to establish a modern banking system in Iran. Since it was established as the first State Bank of Iran but was also a British bank, many tensions developed between the bank and the Iranian government. Constant rivalry between the British and the Russians for influence and control of Iran influenced how and where the branch banks were established and operated.

The banknotes of the Imperial Bank of Persia are some of the most beautiful and largest notes ever issued for any nation, yet the story of these notes is complex. There are very few remaining specimens, especially of the earliest notes and those of higher denominations. An elaborate system of branch banks evolved, and the banknotes were printed or stamped as payable only for the issuing branch.

With the emergence of Reza Shah and the Pahlavi dynasty in the mid-1920s, the desire of Iranians to control their own national bank and curtail the influence of the British led to establishment of the Bank Melli Iran (National Bank of Iran). By 1932 the right of the Imperial Bank of Persia to issue banknotes had been withdrawn.

Few researchers have examined the subject in detail, and general references often have inaccurate information. The following study by Michael Bonine attempts to fill in some of the gaps and includes an analysis of several hundred lower-denomination banknotes.

Contents:

Preface by the Editor
The Banknotes of the Imperial Bank of Persia
The Origins of the Imperial Bank of Persia
The Designs and Denominations
The Lion-and-Sun Motif
The Portrait of Naser al-Din Shah
The System of Branch Banks
The Issuing of Imperial Bank Notes
The Date Stamps
The “Payable at” Stamps
The Official Seal of the Government of Persia
The Signatures
Number of Issued Notes, Prefix Letters, and Serial Numbers
The Enigmatic 2nd Series 20 Toman Banknote
Placement of the Serial Numbers
Canceling and Destroying Notes
Robberies and Lost Notes
Survival of Imperial Bank of Persia Banknotes
Afterword by the Editor
References
Catalogue
Appendix A: Series and Denominations
Appendix B: Branch Banks

Michael E. Bonine (1942–2011) was an active member of the University of Arizona’s Departments of Near Eastern Studies and Geography, and founding director of Arizona’s School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies. He published extensively on the human and physical geography of the Middle East. He also turned his hobby of collecting into a scholarly activity as he systematically acquired banknotes of the Imperial Bank of Persia. Extensive research, particularly in London, and painstaking studies of the eighteen denominations printed for the twenty-eight bank branches resulted in this monograph on the Imperial Bank of Persia banknotes.

Kushan, Kushano-Sasanian, and Kidarite Coins

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by David Jongeward and Joe Cribb with Peter Donovan (2015)

List price: US$150
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-334-8 Hardback, 1 vol, 322 pp., color and b/w figs., 79 color pls.

The Kushan Empire was a vast inland empire that stretched across Central and South Asia during the first to fourth centuries AD. The origins of Kushan dynasty continue to be debated, and precise dates, especially for the late Kushan kings, remain elusive, but the coinage reveals the Kushan dynasty as a major force in the cultural and political history of the ancient Silk Road.

Kushan coinage began c. AD 50 with issues of the first Kushan king, Kujula Kadphises (c. AD 50–90). The first Kushan coins were based on Greek, Scythian, and Parthian coin designs already current in the territory of present day Afghanistan and Pakistan. Under Kujula Kadphises’ son Wima Takto (c. AD 91–113) and grandson Wima Kadphises (c. AD 113–127) the coinage system was gradually centralized to serve the entire Kushan empire, stretching from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan to northern India. Gold and copper denominations were established during the reign of Wima Kadphises which were maintained through the reigns of ten more kings until the demise of the Kushan empire in the mid-fourth century AD.

This catalogue presents all the Kushan coins in the American Numismatic Society, with selected illustrations, detailed descriptions and commentary. The production system of Kushan coinage is presented with major revisions of chronology and organization compared with previous publications. This presentation has been based on the latest coin-based research, including die studies and site find analysis. The coins are classified by ruler, metal, mint, production phase, denomination, type and variety. Introductory essays present the historical and cultural contexts of the kings and their coins. All the ANS gold coins and a selection of copper coins are illustrated. This catalogue also features two series of coins issued by the Kushano-Sasanian and the Kidarite Hun rulers of former Kushan territory because they followed and adapted the Kushan coinage system.

The authors intend this catalogue to be a tool for scholars and collectors alike for understanding, identifying, and attributing these fascinating coins that represent four centuries of Central and South Asian ancient history.

Contents:

The Kushan Empire and its Coinage
Kushan Coinage Tradition
Kushan Monetary System and Mints
Previous Studies of Kushan Coins
Kushan, Kushano-Sasanian, and Kidarite Coins in the Collection of the American Numismatic Society
Kushan, Kushano-Sasanian, and Kidarite Coin Types by Ruler
1. Da Yuezhi Coins and the Coinage of Kujula Kadphises (Coins 1–146)
2. The Coinage of Wima Takto (Coins 147–257)
3. The Coinage of Wima Kadphises (Coins 258–369)
4. The Coinage of Kanishka I (Coins 370–708)
5. The Coinage of Huvishka (Coins 709–1081)
6. The Coinage of Vasudeva I (Coins 1082–1200)
7. The Coinage of the Late Kushans (Coins 1201–1688)
Kanishka II
Vasishka
Kanishka III
Vasudeva II
Mahi
Shaka
Kipunadha
8. The Coinage of the Kushano-Sasanians, Part One: Vasudeva Imitations (Coins 1690–2139)
9. The Coinage of the Kushano-Sasanians, Part Two: Royal Issues (Coins 2140–2408)
Unidentified King
Ardashir
Peroz I
Hormizd I
Hormizd II
Peroz II
Varahran
Shapur II
10. The Coinage of the Kidarite Huns (Coins 2409-2444)
11. Unidentifiable Coins (probably Kushan) from the Lincoln Series (Coins 2445–2470)
Appendices
A. North and East India Imitations (Coins A1–A168)
B. Huvishka Portrait Types
C. Deities on Kushan Coins
D. Kushan Tamgas
Addendum: The Story of a Fake Kushan Coin, ANS 1944.100.48106
Concordance to Göbl
Bibliography

Coinage of the Caravan Kingdoms: Studies in the Monetization of Ancient Arabia

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(Numismatic Studies 25, 2010)

by Martin Huth and Peter G. van Alfen

Hardback
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-312-6
602 pp., 42 pls.

Price: US$74.98

This volume represents the first comprehensive look at ancient Arabian coinage in toto since George Hill’s 1922 British Museum catalogue. In addition to a catalogue and updated typologies of Philistian, Nabataean, Minaen, Qatabanian, Sabaean, Himyarite, and Gerrhean coinages, among others, and die studies of the owl and Alexander imitations, this volume features essays written by numismatists, archaeologists, and epigraphists that situate the coins within their political, social, and economic contexts. As these studies demonstrate, the beginnings of coinage in Arabia followed two very distinct traditions, the first along a line running roughly from Gaza on the Mediterranean coast to the Hadhramawt on the Arabian Sea, the other in eastern Arabia, running along the Persian Gulf coast from the mouth of the Euphrates to the Oman peninsula.

Contents:

The Arabian Peninsula, 600 BCE to 600 CE (D. T. Potts)

The Circulation of Forieng Coins within Arabia and of Arabian Coins outside the Peninsula in the Pre-Islamic Era (D. T. Potts)

Monetary Circulation in South West Aravia between the Fourth and Second Centuries BCE: The al-Jawf Hoards of 2001 and 2002 (Martin Huth)

Gods and Kings: On the Imagery of Arabian Coinage (Martin Huth)

The Gold Coins (Martin Huth)

Notes on the Coinages of the Philistian Cities (Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert)

Important Additions to the Corpus of Nabataean Coins since 1990 (Oliver Hoover and Rachel Barkay)

Some Nabataean Questions Reconsidered (Martin Huth)

Athenian Imitations from Arabia (Martin Huth)

Die Studies of the Earliest Qatabanian and Sabaean Coinages (Peter G. van Alfen)

The Monetary Terminology of Ancient South Arabia in Light of New Epigraphic Evidence (Peter Stein)

The So-Called Cursive Legend Reconsidered (Martin Huth and Peter Stein)

Himyarite Kings on Coinage (Christian Robin)

A New Chronology for the Arabian Alexanders (Olivier Callot)

The “Abiel” Coins of Eastern Arabia: A Study of the Aramaic Legends (Michael C. A. MacDonald)

A Die Study of the “Abiel” Coinage of Eastern Arabia (Peter G. van Alfen)

Read a review in Bryn Mawr Classical Review.

View the Plates and Script Tables for Michael C. A. Macdonald, “The ‘Abiel’ Coins of Eastern Arabia: A Study of the Aramaic Legends”:

McDonald Plates – Part A (large file 13MB)
McDonald Plates – Part B (large file 12MB)

Download order form here.

Islamic History through Coins: an Analysis and Catalogue of Tenth-Century Ikhshidid Coinage

Islamic History through Coins: an Analysis and Catalogue of Tenth-Century Ikhshidid Coinage

by Jere L. Bacharach

(American University in Cairo Press, 2006)

Hardcover, 188 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-977-424-930-3
ISBN-10: 977-424-930-5

This volume is an analysis of the norms governing the coinage of the Ikhshidids in the tenth century CE, along with a catalogue of 1,200 examples. This book was the winner of the 2007 Shamma Prize of the Royal Numismatic Society.

Price: $24.50 (no member discount)

Zecca: The Mint of Venice in the Middle Ages

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by Alan M. Stahl

(Published in association with the Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000)

Hardcover, 497 pp.
ISBN-13: 978-0-8018-6383-7
ISBN-10: 0-8018-6383-X

Price: $79.00
Member Price: $63.00

This volume is the first detailed study of the workings of a premodern mint based on both original archival research and detailed study of the coins themselves.

Contents:

Part I: The Venetian Mint and Coinage to 1423
The Age of the Penny, 800–1200
The Age of the Grosso, c. 1200–1285
The Age of the Ducat, 1285–1330
The Age of the Soldino, 1330–1379
The Age of Crisis and Reform, 1379–1423
Part II: The Zecca in the Life of Medieval Venice
The Setting of Mint Policy
Government Control of the Bullion Market
The Economics of the Zecca
The Circulation of Venetian Coinages
Cullers, Clippers, and Counterfeiters
Part III: Within the Mint
The Mintmasters
The Mint Building and Staff
Coin Design and Die Engraving
From Bullion to Coin
The Standards of Medieval Venetian Glass
The Volume of Production at the Venetian Zecca
Appendix: Offices Relating to Bullion and the Zecca
Appendix: Finds of Medieval Venetian Coins
Bibliography

Coins of the Holy Land

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(Ancient Coins in North American Collections 8, 2013)

by Ya’akov Meshorer with Gabriela Bijovsky and Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert; edited by David Hendin and Andrew Meadows

List price: US$190
ISBN-13: 978-0-89722-283-9 Hardback, 2 vols, 344+244pp

The Abraham and Marian Sofaer collection consists of 4,000 coins and related objects produced by the peoples who inhabited the Holy Land from the Persian period in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE through the Crusader Kingdom in the 13th century of the modern era. Assembled over more than 30 years, the collection contains gold, silver and bronze coins of the Persians, Greeks, Samarians, Jews, Nabataeans, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, and Crusaders.

Highlights of the collection include a rich selection of the fractional silver coinage of Samaria; a comprehensive assemblage of the coins of the Hasmonaean and Herodian Jewish dynasties; superb examples of coinage issued during the Jewish revolts from Rome; fully representative runs of the coinages of the cities of Galilee, Samaria, Judaea, Idumaea, and the Decapolis under Roman rule; and rare examples of the Umayyad and Abassid coinages produced in Jerusalem and elsewhere.

All coins are fully described and illustrated on 238 plates. These volumes will serve as standard reference works for archaeologists, historians and numismatists studying two millennia of the history of the Holy Land.

Contents:

Galilee and Samaria
The Coins of Akko-Ptolemais
The Coins of Antipatris
The Coins of Caesarea
The Coins of Caesarea Panias
The Coins of Demetrias
The Coins of Dora
The Coins of Gaba
The Coins of Joppa
The Coins of Neapolis
The Coins of Samaria-Sebaste
The Coins of Sepphoris-Diocaesarea
The Coins of Tiberias
City Coins of Judaea, Idumaea, and Philistia
The Coins of Aelia Capitolina
The Coins of Anthedon
The Coins of Ashdod
The Coins of Ascalon
The Coins of Diospolis
The Coins of Eleutheropolis
The Coins of Gaza
The Coins of Marisa
The Coins of Nicopolis
The Coins of Al-Ramlah
The Coins of Raphia
The Coins of Yubna
The Decapolis and Provincia Arabia
The Coins of Abila
The Coins of Adraa
The Coins of Aylah
The Coins of Bostra
The Coins of Canatha
The Coins of Capitolias
The Coins of Charachmoba
The Coins of Dium
The Coins of Esbous
The Coins of Gadara
The Coins of Gerasa
The Coins of Hippos
The Coins of Medaba
The Coins of Nysa-Scythopolis
The Coins of Pella 188
The Coins of Petra 191
The Coins of Philadelphia 195
The Coins of Philippopolis
The Coins of Rabbathmoba
The Coins of the Samarians, Nabataeans, and Ituraeans
The Coins of the Samarians
The Coins of the Nabataeans
The Coins of the Ituraeans
Jewish Coins
Persian Period
Under the Ptolemies
The Hasmoneans
The Herodian Dynasty
Under Rome
The Jewish War
Under Rome
The Bar Kochba Revolt
Countermarks of Roman legions
Tyrian Shekels as Temple Tribute
Index
Bibliography

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