Guide to Biblical Coins (6th ed.)

by David Hendin

Hardcover ISBN 978-0-89722-741-4
xx + 648 text pages, b/w figs.

Retail Price: $90 + s/h

Member Price: $63 +s/h

Forty-five years after its first edition, Hendin has revised and updated this book to reflect relevant discoveries in archaeology and numismatics of ancient Israel. The metallurgy of Judean coins, symbols on Hasmonean cons, the Hasmonean coin chronology, Herodian mints, irregular issues, the Jewish War, and coin denominations are only a few of the topics that Hendin has updated.

New to the sixth edition is numismatic information about the Kingdom of Adiabene, the Ituraean Kingdom, the Roman Governors of Syria, and coins with images of Old Testament stories.

Many hundreds of new and improved graphics help illuminate the text. The photo plates have been expanded dramatically as have the images in the catalog and text. Includes a complete concordance between previous editions of GBC as well as other key references, elaborate end notes, an expanded bibliography, a full index, and an index of Latin inscriptions on the Judaea Capta coins.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Hendin is an expert in coins and weights of the ancient Levant. His original research has been published in more than 75 journal articles and book chapters and he has written of hundreds of magazine articles.

Hendin is first vice president and adjunct curator at the American Numismatic Society. In addition to Guide to Biblical Coins, he is author of Ancient Scale Weights, Cultural Change, Not Kosher (Forgeries of Ancient Jewish and Biblical Coins), and Collecting Coins plus eight non-numismatic books including the national bestseller Death as a Fact of Life.

Hendin received the Gunnar Holst Foundation Medal at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) in 2013 and the President’s Award of the American Numismatic Association in 2003 and more than a dozen literary awards.

In 1985 and 1986 he was chief numismatist of the Joint Sepphoris Project under the auspices of Duke University and Hebrew University and Duke’s Sepphoris Research Project in 2011.

Hendin earned his M.A. from the University of Missouri School of Journalism in 1970 after a year as a volunteer in the wake of Israel’s Six Day War. Hendin has been listed in Who’s Who in America since 1974.

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Hidden Power

ns42Late Cistophoric Production and the Organization of  Provincia Asia (128–89 BC)
(Numismatic Studies 42)

by Lucia Francesca Carbone

List price: $100 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $70 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404X
ISBN 978-0-89722-363-8
Hardcover, vii + 266 text pages, b/w figs., 142 b/w plates containing images of 1,737 coins.

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Using the production and circulation patterns of the Asian cistophorus as a case study, Hidden Power seeks to develop a better understanding of Roman monetary policy in the province of Asia between its establishment in the 120s BC and the beginning of the Mithraditic Wars.

Hidden Power catalogues and illustrates some 1,737 cistophoric tetradrachms and fractions from the mints of Ephesus, Pergamum, Tralles, Laodicea, Apamea, Adramyteum, Nysa, and Smyrna. Most of the coins included in the study are late cistophori, issues between 134.3 BC and the 60s BC.

Appendix I provides a discussion of the late cistophori of Tralles struck after 89 BC, showing not only the direct correlation between cistophori and Roman military campaigns, but also Roman taxation.

In Appendix II, circulation data have been combined with data derived from the Tralles die study in order to calculate cistophoric production for the entirety of provincia Asia until the end of the late cistophori. This estimate provides a means to assess the financial impact of Roman taxation and exploitation by Roman imperatores over the course of the first half of the first century BC.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lucia Carbone is an ancient historian and numismatist who holds BA and MA degrees from Università Sapienza (Rome) as well as MPhil and PhD degrees from Columbia University (New York). She is currently the Assistant Curator for Roman Coins at the American Numismatic Society. Her main research interest is the impact of Roman imperialism on the monetary and administrative systems of the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire between the second and first centuries BC.

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Order this title from our distributor, Casemate Academic/Oxbow Books. ANS Members, use your discount code at checkout. Forgot the code? Email Emma Pratte, or call 212.571.4470 x117.

White Gold: Studies in Early Electrum Coinage

Edited by Peter van Alfen and Ute Wartenberg
with Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert, Haim Gitler, Koray Konuk, and Catharine C. Lorber

List price: $150 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $105 plus shipping & handling
ISBN 978-0-89722-349-2
Hardcover, x + 707 text pages, b/w and color figures, charts, maps, and tables

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This book collects the most complete, current scholarship on the history of known examples of ancient electrum coinage of the Greek world, with text, catalogues, and images. The volume’s contents and an excerpt from the Preface are below:

Contents

Preface
White Gold and the Beginnings of Coinage: An Introduction to the Current State of Research. Peter van Alfen and Ute Wartenberg.

Part I: The Great Transformation

1. Kristin Kleber. As Skillful as Croesus: Evidence for the Parting of Gold and Silver by Cementation from Second and First Millennium Mesopotamia
2. Haim Gitler and Oren Tal. A View from the Near East: The Transition from Metal to Coin Economy in the Southern Levant
3. John H. Kroll. The Inscribed Account on Lead from the Ephesian Artemisium

Part II: The Earliest Electrum: The Evidence

4. Selene E. Psoma. White Gold and Electrum in Literary Sources and Inscriptions
5. Michael Kerschner and Koray Konuk. Electrum Coins and Their Archaeological Context: The Case of the Artemision of Ephesus
6. Michael Kerschner. The Archaic Temples in the Artemision of the “Central Basis”
7. Bernhard Weisser. An Archaic Striated Electrum Coin from the Sanctuary of Aphrodite at Miletus
8. Kenneth Sheedy. The Question of Archaic Athenian Electrum
9. Nicholas Cahill, Jill Hari, Bülent Önay, Esra Dokumaci. Depletion Gilding of Lydian Electrum Coins and the Sources of Lydian Gold
10. Maryse Blet-Lemarquand and Frédérique Duyrat. Elemental Analysis of the Lydo-Milesian Electrum Coins of the Bibliotèque Nationale de France Using LA-ICP-MS
11. Haim Gitler, Yuval Goren, Koray Konuk, Oren Tal, Peter van Alfen, David
Weisburd. XRF Analysis of Several Groups of Electrum Coins
12. Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert. Phanes: A Die Study

Part III: The Earliest Electrum: Interpretations—Why Coinage?

13. Alain Bresson. The Choice of Electrum Monometallism: When and Why
14. François R. Velde. A Quantitative Approach to the Beginnings of Coinage
15. Donald W. Jones. Mechanism Design Approach to Lydian Coinage
16. John H. Kroll. Issue Identification, Dynastai, and the Plethora of Types in Early Electrum Coinage
17. Peter van Alfen. The Role of “The State” in Early Electrum Coinage

Part IV: Electrum Continuation

18. Ute Wartenberg. Was there an Ionian Revolt Coinage? Monetary Patterns in the Late Archaic Period
19. François de Callataÿ. Prolegomena to a Die Study of the Electrum Coinage of Cyzicus
20. Mariusz Mielczarek. Cyzicene Electrum Coinage and the Black Sea Grain Trade 665
21. Selene E. Psoma. “ Ἥδε Κύζικος πλέα στατήρων”: How to Explain the Electrum Coinage of Cyzicus

Index of Coin Hoards
Index

FROM THE PREFACE

The genesis of this volume took place in 2011 when then Numismatic Curator, Haim Gitler, conceived of a unique exhibition to be held at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem that would showcase the earliest coins in the Western tradition, those struck in electrum. Five hundred coins, all from the collections of Dr. Thomas S. Kaplan, Baron Lorne Thyssen-Bornemisza, and several from the Israel Museum, were displayed in a spectacular exhibition, the first of its kind anywhere that looked at electrum coinage from the seventh to the fourth centuries BCE. Catharine Lorber soon joined Gitler in curating the exhibition, White Gold: Revealing the World’s Earliest Coins, a name suggested by Lorber, which opened in June 2012, with an exhibition catalogue of the same name written by Koray Konuk, Lorber, and edited by Gitler.

Meanwhile, Gitler organized a conference on electrum coinage that was held at the Israel Museum the week the exhibit opened. Tom Kaplan and Lorne Thyssen-Bornemisza, who have been keenly interested in this area of numismatic research, both actively participated in the conference. We are also most grateful for their most generous support, which funded the exhibition and conference, as well as this volume, and also for their help and enthusiasm for this project.  Initially, Gitler, Lorber, and Konuk planned to publish the conference proceedings with the Israel Museum’s imprimatur, but as many of the conference participants felt a follow-up meeting would be beneficial to address some of the outstanding problematic aspects of early electrum raised in Jerusalem, a second White Gold conference was held in November 2013 at the American Numismatic Society (ANS) in New York City. In 2016, it was decided that publication of the proceedings of the two conferences would be undertaken by the ANS with Ute Wartenberg and Peter van Alfen serving as the volume’s editors, who received considerable editorial and other assistance on several of the chapters from Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert. Since 2013, the scope of the volume grew. Scholars, notably Kristin Kleber and Donald Jones, who had not participated in the two original conferences were invited to contribute chapters, and others who had participated offered additional contributions. While the expanded scope of the volume delayed publication, nonetheless we can now offer a fuller and more detailed picture of the evidence at hand for understanding the various contexts in which early electrum coins were produced and used.

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Concordia Disciplinarum

Essays on Ancient Coinage, History, and Archaeology
in Honor of William E. Metcalf
Concordia-Cover

(Numismatic Studies 38)

Edited by Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans

List price: $75 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $52.50 plus shipping & handling

ISSN 051-7404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-357-7
Hardcover, 283 pages, b/w images, color frontispiece

CONTENTS

Editors’ Preface, by Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans

Bibliography of William E. Metcalf

List of Abbreviations

Scythian-Greek Relations in the North and Northwestern Black Sea Area (6th–5th centuries BC): Numismatic Evidence, by Elena Stolyarik

The Process of Monetization from Athens to Egypt: Evidence and Models, by Andrew Hogan

The Thrace (?) ca. 1955 Hoard (IGCH 738), by Peter van Alfen

Numismatic Evidence for Compound Numbers Written in Greek Alphabetic Numerals, by Paul Keyser

The Asia Minor 1949 Hoard (IGCH 1450) at the American Numismatic Society, by Constantin A. Marinescu

Seeing Caesar’s Symbols: Religious Implements on the Coins of Julius Caesar and his Successors, by Roberta Stewart

A New Revival of an Old Coin Type: Sardis in the Augustan Era, by Jane DeRose Evans

Earthquakes in Asia Minor, the cura provinciae of Tiberius and the Cities, by Bernhard Weisser

A Neronian Overstrike at the Harvard Art Museums, by Carmen Arnold-Biucchi and Rebecca A. Katz

The Flavian Colosseum Sestertii and Imperial Praise, by Nathan T. Elkins

The Forum of Domitian on his Coins, by Ben Lee Damsky

Roma at Corinth: The Coins and the Monument, by Mary Hoskins Walbank

Le monnayage émis à Silandos de Lydie sous Septime Sévère, by Michel Amandry

The Coinage of Septimius Severus and the Battle of Lugdunum, by Gary Reger

Imperial Representation and Distributional Politics under Severus Alexander, by Carlos F. Noreña

Quantifying the Size of a Coinage: Die Studies or Coin Finds, by Roger Bland

An Aureus of Allectus with a Remarkable Pedigree, by Andrew Burnett

Interaction with Coins in the Liberalitas Relief on the Arch of Constantine, by Martin Beckmann

A Double-Obverse Bronze of the Constantinian Period from the Antioch Excavations, by Alan M. Stahl and Rafail Zoulis

The Ascension of Julian: Ammianus Marcellinus 20.4, by Sarah E. Cox

Index

FROM THE PREFACE

William E. Metcalf is a prominent name in numismatics, but is also universally recognized among those who study Roman history and archaeology. Known especially for his many contributions to Roman and Byzantine coinage, it is difficult to find a book or article that does not cite his work. A generous scholar, one can see his name in the acknowledgements in works by numismatists and scholars in adjacent disciplines who incorporate numismatic evidence. It is thus appropriate— and overdue—that his former students and colleagues present this Festschrift in recognition of Metcalf ’s impact on our discipline. It would be impossible to incorporate contributions from all of his colleagues and friends; the contributors herein represent but a fraction of those who would honor him.

His articles and reviews number in the hundreds, and he is author and editor of several books. Some of his best-known research centers on the cistophori. In 1980, he published his doctoral dissertation as his first monograph: The Cistophori of Hadrian (New York: American Numismatic Society, Numismatic Studies 15). Continuing this work is his recent The Later Republican Cistophori (New York: American Numismatic Society, Numismatic Notes and Monographs 170, 2017). A mark of his place in the entire field of numismatics is his editorship of The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012). Although retired from teaching and curating, he continues his research, and is currently completing Roman Provincial Coinage X (Valerian to Diocletian).

Bill, as he is called by friends and colleagues, received his degrees from the University of Michigan. He was awarded his A.B. in Latin, with distinction and highest honors, in 1969, his A.M. in Classical Studies in 1970, and his Ph.D. in Classical Studies in 1973. That same year, he came to New York to begin his long association with the American Numismatic Society, where he would work until 2000. From 1973 to 1975, he served as Assistant Curator of Roman and Byzantine Coins; in 1975, he was promoted to Associate Curator, and in 1978, to Deputy Chief Curator. He succeeded Margaret Thompson as Chief Curator in 1979, and remained in this position until his departure in 2000. Presently, he is Honorary Curator and Life Fellow at the ANS. While serving at the ANS, Bill was appointed Visiting Professor or Adjunct Professor at several institutions, including Columbia University, Princeton University, Università degli Studi di Padova, Bryn Mawr College, Rutgers University, and New York University. In 2002, he was hired as the Curator of Coins and Medals at the Yale University Art Gallery and as Professor of Classics (adj.) at Yale University. In 2007, with the endowment of his curatorial position, he was named Ben Lee Damsky Curator of Coins and Medals, a title that he held until his retirement from Yale in 2014. Prof. Metcalf holds many distinguished honors and awards that recognize his research. Some key highlights are his membership at the Institute for Advanced Study in 1988–1989, his election as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1998, and his receipt of the Jeton de Vermeil of the Société Française de Numismatique in 2008. He is also the honorand of the annual William E. Metcalf Lecture Series of the Archaeological Institute of America, established in 2000 by Anna Maguerite McCann.

Among the people who influenced Bill’s professional development, two stand out. The first is Theodore “Ted” V. Buttrey (1929–2018), his mentor and advisor for his Ph.D. It was Ted who introduced him to the discipline of numismatics, involving him in the publication of the coins from the University of Michigan’s excavations at Carthage. These initial studies led to Bill’s interest and expertise in Roman Provincial coins (see also Metcalf 1977, 1979a, 1982b, 1987a, 1989, 2000, 2002a, 2007, 2008a, 2014, 2017) and the publication of hoards and excavation coins (Metcalf 1974a, 1974b 1975a, 1975b, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979b, 1979c, 1980, 1981a, 1981b, 1982a, 1987b, 1988, 19912, 1994, 1995/6, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002b). Ted’s ability to question received knowledge is clearly reflected in Bill’s careful arguments and fresh insights.

At the American Numismatic Society, he met his supervisor, mentor, and friend, the redoubtable Margaret Thompson (1911–1992). She exemplified for him unstinting work on behalf of the American Numismatic Society, the conduct of scholarly discourse, and the interest in bodies of material beyond the cataloging of particular coin types.

Teaching the next generation of numismatic scholars has been part of Bill’s life, as the two editors of this volume can attest. He has promoted the work of numismatics by introducing younger scholars to established scholars and collectors, and to dig directors who need numismatists for their excavations. His careful reading of forthcoming manuscripts has saved many an error or half-baked idea from going to readers or editors. His service to the field is reflected in his reviews of manuscripts and books, and service on the editorial boards for Lexicon Mythologiae Classicae, American Journal of Archaeology, Journal of Roman Archaeology, American Journal of Numismatics, Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, and Bryn Mawr Classical Review, and on various committees for the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) and the Archaeological Institute of America.

We offer this book in gratitude, as a reflection of Bill’s interests and deep scholarship, and an homage to his friendship and teaching.

Nathan T. Elkins and Jane DeRose Evans, May 2018

 

Coins of the Ptolemaic Empire    (2 vols.)

Coins of the Ptolemaic Empire

by Catherine C. Lorber

List price (2 vols.): $325.00 plus shipping & handling
Member price (2 vols.): $230.00 plus shipping & handling
ISBN (2-volume, shrinkwrapped set): 978-0-89722-356-0
Hardcover, 2-volume set, 8.5″ x 11″
Bronze Vol.: 205 pages, 46 b/w plates
Precious Metal Vol.: 625 pages, 76 b/w plates, 5 maps

Click here to order from our distributor.

Coins of the Ptolemaic Empire, Part 1, Volumes 1 and 2 (Precious Metal and Bronze) by Catharine Lorber, is the massive, long-anticipated catalogue of coins struck by the first four Ptolemaic kings. It essentially rewrites the sections on these rulers in J. N. Svoronos’ classic, but now much out of date, Ta Nomismata tou Kratous ton Ptolemaion (1904). The body of coinage catalogued by Svoronos is enlarged by more than 300 further emissions in precious metal and more than 180 emissions in bronze, recorded from subsequent scholarship, from hoards, from commercial sources, and from private collections, and constituting about a third of the total catalogue entries. Lorber’s attributions, dates, and interpretations rest on numismatic research since Svoronos, or on the latest archaeological and hoard information. She also provides extensive historical and numismatic introductions that give the coins deeper context and meaning. The coinage of Ptolemies I through IV is supplemented by a few issues possibly attributable to Cleomenes of Naucratis, the predecessor of Ptolemy I in Egypt, as well as by coinages of Ptolemy Ceraunus, Magas, and Ptolemy of Telmessus, members of the Lagid dynasty ruling their own kingdoms outside of Egypt.

About the Author

Catharine Lorber holds a BA in Classical Greek from UCLA. She spent nearly 40 years as a cataloguer in commercial numismatics, from the early 1970s until her retirement in 2009. As an independent researcher she specialized in the publication of coin hoards as well as studies pertaining to North Greek, Thessalian, Judaean, Seleucid, and Ptolemaic coinages. Her most important previous contribution was in the Seleucid field, in collaboration with Arthur Houghton: Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalogue (Part I, 2002; Part II, 2008, with Oliver Hoover as a third coauthor). Her book credits also include Amphipolis: The Civic Coinage in Silver and Gold (1990). Since 2000 Lorber has published more than 40 papers and book chapters treating Ptolemaic coinage or iconography.

Ancient Engraved Gems in the National Museum in Krakow

krakowgemsBy Paweł Gołyźniak (in English)
ISBN: 978-3-95490-243-9
Publisher: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag
Hardcover, 318 pages, 30 b/w figures, 112 b/w plates
8.5″ x 12″, lay-flat binding

$150 plus S&H (no member discount)

Ancient Engraved Gems in the National Museum in Krakow is considerable in size and top in quality. It consists mostly of the specimens assembled by the extraordinary collector and art dealer Constantine Schmidt- Ciążyński (1818–1889). Almost 780 cameos, intaglios, scarabs, and finger rings are presented in this beautifully designed volume. This book will be useful not only to scholars interested in gems, but also to those who study the history of the art market and collecting, as well as to enthusiasts of Classical art and archaeology.

Part I: History and Character of the Collections (includes a brief biography of Constantine Schmidt-Ciążyński and the history and original structure of the collection).

Part II: Catalogue (includes hundreds of entries featuring a Babylonian cylinder seal, Egyptian plaque, Mycenaean seal, Archaic Greek gems, Classical Greek finger rings, Hellenistic Gems and finger rings, Etruscan scarabs and ring stones, Italic and Roman Republican gems, Augustan gems, Roman Imperial gems, Cameos, Early Christian gems, and appendixes on magical and Sassanian gems). Indexed by collectors and collections, subjects, and materials, with a concordance and bibliography.

Faces of Power

Faces of Power

Faces of Power: Roman Gold Coins from the Victor A. Adda Collection

edited by Haim Gitler and Gil Gambash

List price: $70 plus shipping & handling (no member discount)
Hardcover, 312 pages, figures

$70 plus S&H (no member discount)

ONLY 30 COPIES AVAILABLE

This extraordinary 312-page volume was compiled on the occasion of the special exhibition Faces of Power at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, featuring the unique collection of Victor A. Adda.

With introductions by his daughter Giovanna Adda Coen and Arturo Russo, and contributions by renowned experts in that field such as Richard Abdy, Michel Amandry, Roger Bland, Andrew Burnett, Aleksander Bursche, Matti Fischer, Gil Gambash, Christian Gazdac, Haim Gitler, Jonathan Grimaldi, Achim Lichtenberger, Jerome Mairat, Rodolfo Martini, Markus Peter, Yaniv Schauer, Johan van Heesch, and Bernhard Woytek not only help to demonstrate the fascinating history of Roman rulers but also portray the achievement of one of the greatest collectors of his time.

A Numismatica Ars Classica NAC AG book published in association with the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, offered on consignment by the ANS.

Roman Coins, Money, and Society in Elizabethan England

OWRF-cover(Numismatic Studies 36)

by Richard Simpson, Andrew Burnett, and Deborah Thorpe

List price: $80 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $55 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-352-2
Hardcover, 230 text pages, 34 b/w figures

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The idea of publishing Sir Thomas Smith’s On the Wages of the Roman Footsoldier (OWRF) grew out of the successful conference held at the Society of Antiquaries of London in December 2013 to mark the 500th anniversary of Smith’s birth. OWRF is virtually unknown to modern scholarship, and, although it is the first original work written in England to use the evidence of ancient coins, it has previously played no part in the history of numismatics. Yet it clearly deserves to be better known, both for that reason and for many others. It throws new light on the “Cambridge circle,” the group of academics-turned-politicians who played a crucial role in the smooth accession of Elizabeth I. It allows us to reconstruct something of the humanistic interest in numismatics, adumbrated earlier in the century by Tunstall and More, but otherwise only returning to visibility with the work of Camden, Cotton, and the Elizabethan College of Antiquaries. It provides another strand to our knowledge of the importance of the Roman precedent in both influencing contemporary thought and having a direct bearing on contemporary politics.

Sir Thomas Smith, like many of his works, has also slipped from public awareness, overshadowed in the modern imagination by contemporaries like Cecil, Walsingham, or Gresham. Yet Smith was one of the most important politicians and intellectuals of the day; a brilliant academic career at Cambridge was followed by his active participation in politics under Edward VI, Mary, and Elizabeth. He played a leading role in the controversial reform of Greek pronunciation, he introduced a new style of continental architecture to England, and he wrote analyses of the politics of his day, including his views on the relations between the monarch and parliament, views which were to be seized on in the crisis of the 17th century in a way which would no doubt have startled Smith, had he lived to see it.

For this reason the publication of the OWRF is accompanied by Richard Simpson’s personal and intellectual biography of this most important of the “missing persons” of the 16th century. The biography is intended partly to remedy some of the misconceptions about Smith, but, more importantly to set OWRF and his other writings in a coherent  biographical framework.

Roman Coins, Money, and Society in Elizabethan England is a work of scrupulous scholarship . . . . a book that will demand a place in every scholarly numismatic library, public and personal.”

—David Dykes, British Numismatic Journal 88 (2018), pp. 241–43.

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Order this title from our distributor, Casemate Academic/Oxbow Books. ANS Members, use your discount code at checkout. Forgot the code? Email Emma Pratte, or call 212.571.4470 x117.

Coins, Artists, and Tyrants: Syracuse in the Time of the Peloponnesian War

(Numismatic Studies 33)

by Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert
Ute Wartenberg, Editor
with selected passages from L. O. Tudeer,
Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Syrakus in der Periode der signierenden Künstler
translated by Orla Mulholland,
and a biographical sketch about Tudeer by Tuukka Talvio

List price: $200 plus shipping & handling
Member price: $140 plus shipping & handling
ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-341-6
Hardcover, 400 text pages, b/w figures, 27 b/w plates, hoards pull-out, signed tetradrachms pull-out, color die-link chart pull-out

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Coins, Artists, and Tyrants contains the first fully translated and revised text of Lauri O. Tudeer, Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Syrakus in der Periode der signierenden Künstler, as well as a biography of Tudeer, plus a completely new evaluation of signed coin dies and the artists who produced them. Over 100 years after its first publication, Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert completely updates the scholarship and bibliography on signed Syracusan tetradrachms, making this book the single most important source on the subject. The book includes plates, a full-color die-link chart, and three pull-outs featuring Syracusan tetradrachms and hoards.

Wolfgang R. Fischer-Bossert is an independent scholar specializing in Archaic and Classical coinages of the Greeks including their barbarous neighbours in both the Balkans and the Levant. He has been on the staff of the German Archaeological Institute at Athens and has also worked with the excavation teams at Boğazköy-Hattuša and Karatepe/Cilicia in Turkey. He has published widely, and has taught Classics and Ancient Numismatics at the Freie Universität, Berlin, and at Vienna University. He currently holds a post-doc at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for the Study of Ancient Culture.

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Monuments in Miniature: Architecture on Roman Coinage

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miniature

(Numismatic Studies Volume 29, 2015)

by Nathan T. Elkins
List price: US$100
ANS Members Price $70.00

ISSN 0517-404-x
ISBN 978-0-89722-344-7
Hardcover, 240 pp.

The representation of monuments and buildings on Roman coinage is one of the most popular topics in studies of coin iconography. In addition to numismatists, it attracts the attention of historians, art historians, archaeologists, and topographers. Although the subject of numerous books and articles, architectural representations have been appreciated primarily for the evidence they might yield for a monument’s appearance or existence. This approach is limited as the methodologies applied are often narrow or inconsistent and often betray modern biases. Instead of using images on coins as evidence for reconstruction, this book contextualizes monumental representations on the coinage within their broader historical, social, and political contexts, by addressing how and why images evolved through time and by investigating why architectural representation emerged on and disappeared from the coinage. In so doing, this book also treats all incidences of architectural representation on the Republican and Imperial coinages in order to provide the first comprehensive treatment of architecture on the state-sanctioned coinage. This book is, therefore, a resource to a broad range of specialists interested in the phenomenon of architectural representation and its significance in the Roman world.

Contents:

Introduction: A New Look at Architectural Representations on Roman Coinage
Chapter 1. The Emergence of Architectural Designs on the Coinage of the Roman Republic
Chapter 2. Architectural Coin Types in the Early Roman Empire (Augustus through Severus Alexander)
Chapter 3. Late Roman Architectural Coin Types (The “Soldier Emperors” through Valentinian III)
Chapter 4. Architectural Coin Types from the Roman Provinces: Characteristics, Derivation, and Influence
Conclusions: Architectural Coin Types as a Reflection of Roman Society
Appendix 1. Roman Architectural Coin Types (135 bc–Severus Alexander)
Appendix 2. Architectural Coin Types of the “Soldier Emperors”
Appendix 3. Architectural Coin Types of the Tetrarchy and its Collapse to c. AD 313
Appendix 4. Architectural Coin Types from Constantine and Licinius to Valentinian III
Bibliography

Nathan Elkins earned his BA in archaeology and Classical studies at the University of Evansville before earning his MA in the City of Rome at the University of Reading (UK) and PhD in Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. This book resulted from his 2004 attendance at the Eric P. Newman Graduate Seminar in Numismatics at the ANS. Elkins is currently an assistant professor of art history at Baylor University.