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American Journal of Numismatics Guidelines Updated for 2018

The American Journal of Numismatics is an international, peer-reviewed journal that annually publishes original research in all areas of numismatics, in the form of articles, review articles, and short notes. Interdisciplinary contributions that relate numismatic research to broader questions of archaeology, anthropology, art history, economic history, cultural or social history, and related disciplines are particularly welcome. Questions and submissions should be emailed to Nathan T. Elkins (Greek, Roman, pre-Islamic Persian, Celtic, and other ancient topics) or David Yoon (medieval, modern, Asian, American, and other non-ancient topics).

The AJN is published once a year. The annual deadline for submissions is May 1. The journal’s guidelines have been updated for 2018.

Manuscript Preparation

Prior to submission, manuscripts should be complete and formatted according to AJN guidelines. If you have questions about the preparation of the manuscript that are not answered here, please email the editors. After manuscripts are complete, submit them by email to Nathan T. Elkins (Greek, Roman, pre-Islamic Persian, Celtic, and other ancient topics) or David Yoon (medieval, modern, Asian, American, and other non-ancient topics).

Articles may range from brief research notes (minimum of 1,000 words) to lengthy articles exceeding 10,000 words. Authors should contact the editors before submitting an article in excess of 15,000 words (including footnotes and bibliography); these can usually be accommodated, but space may become limited close to the annual deadline for submissions. Articles that are under review elsewhere will not be considered, and articles that have been previously published will not be considered unless there are no legal restrictions on the author’s right to republish and the information is not available in any widely known language of international scholarship.

For anonymity during the peer-review process, authors may wish to omit overt references to their own work, or acknowledgements that would relay their identity. Any special characters or non-Latin writing systems should use Unicode fonts where possible; if this is not possible, authors should use a font that is distributed under a non-restrictive, free-of-charge license and send the font to the editors with the manuscript.

 When a manuscript is accepted for publication, the author will be asked to provide the final artwork, copies of any necessary permissions, and a revised version of the manuscript that incorporates all changes specified in the acceptance letter and conforms to the guidelines described below. A manuscript will not be scheduled for production until all requested revisions, illustrations, and permissions have been received. Once the revised manuscript has been submitted, no major changes to the text will be allowed unless extraordinary circumstances warrant them. For the preparation of the final manuscript and accompanying illustrations, it is essential for authors to refer to the ANS Author Guidelines.

The AJN largely follows The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. (CMS), and enforces American English spelling. All publishers encourage the practice of following a consistent style, and authors in numismatic studies should find it helpful to follow these guidelines from the beginning of the writing process, even if their manuscript ultimately is published elsewhere. The Chicago Manual of Style prescribes two citation formats; in general, AJN articles aimed at a humanities audience may prefer to use the first (“Notes and Bibliography”) format.

Example 1

Text: …in the direction of Jerusalem via Diospolis in 614 ce.156 The written sources do…

Notes:

  1. J. F. Haldon, Byzantium in the Seventh Century: The Transformation of a Culture, rev. ed. (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997), 42; C. Foss, “The Persians in the Roman Near East (602–630 AD),” Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society 13 (2003): 152–53.

Bibliography:

Foss, C. “The Persians in the Roman Near East (602–630 AD).” Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society 13 (2003): 149–170.

Haldon, J. F. Byzantium in the Seventh Century: The Transformation of a Culture. Rev. ed. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

However, recognizing that numismatics is a cross-disciplinary specialization, authors writing more for a science or social science audience may prefer to use the second (“Author-Date References”) format.

Example 2

Text: …20–25% silver (Baker et al. 2017; Crusafont 1982, 237), compared to perhaps 2–4%…

References List:

Baker, J., V. Kantarelou, A. G. Karydas, R. E. Jones, P. Siozos, D. Anglos, and B. Denham. 2017. “The Height of Denier Tournois Minting in Greece (1289–1313) According to New Archaeometric Data.” Annual of the British School at Athens. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0068245416000113.

Crusafont i Sabater, M. 1982. Numismática de la corona catalano-aragonesa medieval (785–1516). Madrid: Editorial Vico.

Digital Data

ANS print publications are integrated with digital publication. All authors are requested to provide their ORCID identifier so that their article can be correctly attributed to them online. Authors who do not yet have an ORCID identifier can easily create one at orcid.org; the editors can advise on this process if necessary.

Articles that present large amounts of quantitative information (e.g., metrological analyses of large groups of coins) are encouraged to provide the quantitative data as a digital file that the ANS can make available to other researchers online, rather than putting the raw data in print. This digital AJN data repository can also be used to make available supplementary material that supports an article without being integral to it.

Publication of Previously Unpublished Material

The AJN supports laws designed to discourage fraudulent collectibles and the illicit trade in antiquities. Objects originating before ca. 1500 whose history cannot be traced before the adoption of the UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illegal Import, Export, and Transfer of Cultural Property of November 14, 1970, are subject to certain limitations for publication in AJN, if they have not previously been published in a scholarly (non-commercial) publication. If the object is in an institutional collection, has been reported to an official finds recording system (e.g., the Portable Antiquities Scheme), or has entered the marketplace legally (e.g., after review under the Treasure Act in the United Kingdom), there are no restrictions. Otherwise, if the information has a verifiable source such as a prior publication, a published sale catalogue, or a named owner, it may be used in publication as part of a larger discussion (e.g., a die study, a typological study, etc.) but not as the sole focus of the article. If no such source can be cited, the object is not suitable for publication. AJN reserves the option to reject any contribution that appears to publish recently looted or stolen material, especially from recent conflict zones, even if it otherwise meets these conditions.

Images and Sources of Images

 Images, charts, and graphs should not be embedded in the final text. Refer to the ANS Author Guidelines for the preparation of images. It is the author’s responsibility to secure and provide written permission for the use of any illustrations taken from other publications, the Internet, or other sources (in general, authors should assume that any image created after 1922 is restricted by copyright unless there is evidence to the contrary). All illustrations should have an attribution to source unless created by the author(s).

For ancient material, authors should give preference to illustrations of objects held by institutional collections over unprovenanced material from the trade or in private collections. Many institutions allow images of their holdings to be used free of charge for academic publications such as the AJN; if uncertain whether this applies, please discuss image sources with the editors. Illustrations of objects from the trade or in private collections may be used where necessary for completeness, if they can be cited to a verifiable source (as described in the previous section); however, objects with a verifiable pre-1970 provenance or in institutional collections should be used wherever possible. In general, articles that deal with types and iconography should always use institutional images, unless dealing with a type that is unknown in such collections. If contributors are unclear as to the guidelines or expectations, please contact the appropriate editor.

Conflict of Interest

Authors should disclose any potential conflict of interest at the time of submission. For instance, if the article describes or illustrates objects that the author owns or seeks to sell, this should be declared in a footnote.

Open Access

There is no embargo period for authors wishing to share their work online or through their institutional repository. The editors do ask that authors wait to share their work until the formal publication of the volume.